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Police Department - University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

University of Illinois Police Department

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

An informed campus is a safer campus. This report is published as required by federal law in order to give you the information you need to keep yourself and others safe.

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report 2019

Table of contents

This report includes information for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus and the Illini Center separate campus. Published September 2019.

A PDF version of this webpage is also available.

 

Messages from campus leaders

Letter from the chancellor

Chancellor Robert J. Jones
Chancellor Robert J. Jones – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dear campus community member:

The top priority for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is ensuring that our community is as safe and secure as possible for our students, faculty, staff and visitors to work, live and learn. We have the support and services of what I believe to be one of the best community-focused university police forces in the country looking out for all of us here.

The University of Illinois Police Department continues to build on effective programs and to establish innovative new ones that help make this a safer place for the entire Illinois family. There are a few important initiatives and efforts I would like to highlight:

  • Our security camera network includes more than 1,900 cameras and growing. This program is an important part to improving the environmental safety of our campus and enhances our ability to identify and apprehend offenders when crime occurs.
  • Mental health challenges continue to be a major safety concern here at Illinois along with campuses around the country. The Division of Public Safety is in active collaboration with staff from the Counseling Center, the Office of the Dean of Students and other campus service providers to ensure a comprehensive approach to helping those individuals who might be dealing with these challenges.
  • The University Police Department continues to lean on its Special Victims Unit, a group of detectives specially trained in trauma-informed interviewing techniques, best practices in sexual assault investigations and caring for survivors.
  • Neighboring police agencies have also begun to rely on the strength and expertise of this unit to investigate sexual assault incidents involving students, as University Police detectives are adept at understanding and focusing on the unique needs of our campus community members.
  • Our international community faces unique safety challenges. We have a strong history of working with our international student and scholar community and we continue to see to it that those who have come from abroad to study can do so in a safe environment.
  • Staff in our Office of Emergency Management work fulltime to prepare our campus community members as well as visitors for mass emergencies. Planners have completed emergency plans for more than 325 campus buildings and conduct ongoing training for those who work and study in those buildings.
  • We continue to grow our long-established partnership with the Champaign and Urbana police departments, Champaign County Sheriff’s Office and state and federal agencies to reduce criminal activity in the greater community.

We have a very safe campus, but we must recognize that a community of our size will never be entirely crime-free. Chief Stone and his team continually emphasize that our most effective safety measures are found through a partnership with the students, staff and faculty who comprise our community.

Your efforts to take appropriate precautions for your own safety, to alert authorities of dangerous or suspicious behaviors and to watch out for the safety of friends and colleagues are the most effective public safety tools we have.

Thanks for your help and for your support of our law enforcement officers and fire safety officials to make this a safe and secure campus for all of us.

Sincerely,
Robert J. Jones
Chancellor

 

Letter from the chief of police

Chief Craig Stone
Executive Director of Public Safety and Chief of Police Craig A. Stone.

Dear campus community:

Thank you for taking the time to review this Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, as your active participation in the public safety of our community is critical to enhancing the quality of campus life.

At the University Police Department, we have made great strides in promoting and maintaining public safety during the past year. We have partnered with neighboring law enforcement agencies including the Champaign Police Department, Urbana Police Department and Champaign County Sheriff’s Office to make our campus the most-densely patrolled area in the region.

Our work with the Community Coalition continues to be an effective partnership to reinforce our community-based policing philosophy. Other programs like our Special Victims Unit and crime prevention activities are uniquely tailored for a campus environment.

But few things are more useful than our community members taking on the responsibility to look out for themselves and others. With the information contained in this report, you are empowering yourself to take control of your own well-being and that of our community.

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act, a copy of this Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is available online at police.illinois.edu/clery. A hard copy may be obtained by contacting the Division of Public Safety at 217-333-1216. This report includes crime statistics for the previous three years, institutional policies concerning campus safety and security and other crime prevention information.

We hope that our students, staff and faculty will continue to take advantage of the resources we have made available to the campus community. Please take a moment to visit our website, police.illinois.edu, to learn more about what the Division of Public Safety does to prevent and respond to crime. You can also follow us on Twitter(@UIPD) or like us on Facebook and Instagram (@uipolice) to receive regular updates and important public safety information.

The members of the Division of Public Safety are each passionately committed to keeping the Illinois campus and the Illini Center safe places to live, study, work and visit. Each member of the campus community is a valued partner in this endeavor. Together we will continue to make our community a safe place where excellence in education, research and public service can flourish.

Sincerely,

Craig A. Stone

Executive Director of Public Safety and Chief of Police

 

PART I: Annual Security Report

Introduction

Altgeld Hall bell tower
Altgeld Hall bell tower.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign prepares this report in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (“the Clery Act”) and the State of Illinois Campus Security Enhancement Act. This report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus; in certain non-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also includes institutional policies on campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and other matters.

The full text of this report is available online at police.illinois.edu/clery. This report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. These entities provide updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the Clery Act.

Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics include those reported to the University of Illinois Police, designated Campus Security Authorities as defined under the Clery Act, and local law enforcement agencies. Each year, an email notification is sent to all enrolled students, faculty and staff.

The email provides information on how to access the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report online. Copies of this report may also be obtained at the Public Safety Building at 1110 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana.

The commitment of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to the most fundamental principles of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity requires that decisions involving students and employees be based on individual merit and be free from discrimination in all its forms.

It is the policy of the University not to engage in discrimination or harassment against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, disability, national origin, citizenship status, ancestry, age, order of protection status, genetic information, marital status, sexual orientation including gender identity, arrest record status, unfavorable discharge from the military, or status as a protected veteran and to comply with all federal and state nondiscrimination, equal opportunity, and affirmative action laws, orders, and regulations. This Nondiscrimination Policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in University programs and activities. In furtherance of Illinois’ commitment to the principles of equality and equal opportunity, this policy may be invoked by students, applicants, visitors, faculty, staff, employees, and former employees of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

University complaint and grievance procedures provide employees and students with the means for the resolution of complaints that allege a violation of this statement. Members of the public should direct their inquiries or complaints to the Office for Access and Equity.

 

Crime Statistics

UIPD police officer
UIPD police officer.

In this section…

 

About the crime statistics

These are the crimes that have been reported to the University Police Department by victims who have filed a report, by Campus Security Authorities who have been made aware of a criminal incident or by other law enforcement agencies. Some categories include footnotes below each table. More specific information about crime definitions and how these statistics are counted is available in the section titled "Annual disclosure of crime statistics." To see how these statistics compare to similar schools around the country, visit police.illinois.edu/CleryStats.

 

Criminal offenses reported by hierarchy

Offense On campus Residence facility1 Non-campus property Public property
Murder/non-negligent manslaughter2 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 1 1 0 0
Manslaughter by negligence 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0 0
Rape 2018 30 21 7 0
2017 35 29 15 0
2016 17 14 11 0
Fondling 2018 17 10 3 3
2017 14 11 1 0
2016 4 1 1 0
Incest 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0 0
Robbery 2018 2 0 1 3
2017 2 0 1 1
2016 3 0 1 1
Aggravated assault 2018 3 0 1 8
2017 7 3 0 2
2016 3 1 9 3
Burglary 2018 9 7 5 0
2017 18 9 7 0
2016 32 11 10 0
Motor vehicle theft 2018 2 0 0 0
2017 4 0 2 0
2016 4 0 8 1
Arson3 2018 3 3 1 0
2017 3 1 0 0
2016 3 2 0 0

 


Footnotes

1The residence facility category is a subset of the “On campus” category.
2In 2016, the accused student pleaded guilty to endangering the life or health of a child.
3Arson is not part of the hierarchy. Arson is always counted regardless of the nature of any other offense committed during the same incident.
Please note: If rape, fondling, incest or statutory rape occur in the same incident as a murder, both the murder and the sex offense are reflected in these statistics.

 

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) offenses

Offense On campus Residence facility1 Non-campus property Public property
Domestic Violence 2018 27 20 3 2
2017 23 13 8 4
2016 16 14 6 0
Dating violence2 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0 0
Stalking 2018 61 8 4 2
2017 54 13 1 0
2016 44 10 2 0

 


Footnotes

1The residence facility category is a subset of the “On campus” category.
2Illinois state law does not define dating violence. Incidents that would otherwise be considered dating violence are included in statistics for domestic violence.

 

Arrests and referrals for disciplinary action

Offense On campus Residence facility1 Non-campus property Public property
Liquor Law Arrests2 2018 3 0 0 4
2017 1 0 2 6
2016 0 0 0 5
Drug Law Arrests2 2018 14 7 1 10
2017 17 10 5 6
2016 40 20 2 13
Weapons Law Arrests2 2018 0 0 1 0
2017 0 0 0 0
2016 1 0 0 5
Liquor Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2018 236 234 0 13
2017 274 249 1 19
2016 259 243 2 2
Drug Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action3 2018 54 51 0 0
2017 360 243 0 2
2016 249 172 0 1
Weapons Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2018 0 0 0 0
2017 1 1 0 0
2016 0 0 1 0

 


Footnotes

1The residence facility category is a subset of the “On campus” category.
2In 2016, court summonses issued under city ordinances were recategorized as civil citations, not arrests. These incidents now appear in the discipline referral category if the offender was a university student.
3In 2018, Illinois state law no longer included possession of 10 grams or less of cannabis to be a criminal law violation. Therefore, these instances were no longer referred.

 

Hate crimes

In 2018, there was one intimidation incident with a bias of national origin that occurred On-Campus.

In 2017, there were 0 hate crimes.

In 2016, there were 0 hate crimes.

 

Unfounded crimes

In 2018, there were 3 unfounded crimes.

In 2017, there were 7 unfounded crimes.

In 2016, there were 4 unfounded crimes.

 

Crimes with unknown locations

Under the Clery Act, the university is required to disclose statistics regarding crimes which occurred on campus property, non-campus property or public property within or immediately adjacent to campus. Some of the following crimes may have qualified to be counted in the statistics reported in the above tables; however, they were reported with no information or insufficient information about location. The university is not required to include these statistics in this report, but they are nonetheless included in order to provide campus community members with the best possible information about crime on or near campus:

  • Rape: 27 rapes were reported with unknown locations.
  • Fondling: Four fondling incidents were reported with unknown locations.
  • Domestic Violence: Three incidents of domestic violence occurred in unknown locations.
  • Stalking: Two incidents of stalking were reported in an unknown location.

It is not uncommon for a crime to be reported without information about a location. This could happen for a number of reasons — for example, the location may be unknown to all parties involved, the reporting person may not be able to recall the exact location of the crime, or the information was not disclosed to a third-party who then reported the incident to the police.

It is possible that some of the incidents reported above are duplicates, but the university did not have the information to discern that redundancy.

The University Police Department makes its best effort to share all relevant information about a crime with the campus community, but some information may not always be available.

Information about these crimes has been shared in the interest of transparency and so campus community members have the information they need to be responsible for their safety and the safety of others.

Crime definitions

University building column
In this section…

 

Annual disclosure of crime statistics

As required by federal law, the University Police Department’s yearly crime statistics are compiled on a calendar-year basis in accordance with the definitions of crimes provided by the FBI for use in the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) system. The report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning crimes that occurred on campus and were reported to University Police or designated campus officials, such as Campus Security Authorities. Additionally, these statistics include people referred for campus disciplinary action for categories required under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, including liquor and drug law violations and illegal weapons possession. Statistical information for certain non-campus locations or property owned or controlled by the university, as well as public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from campus, are collected or requested from the Urbana and Champaign police departments and other law enforcement agencies. For statistical purposes, crime statistics reported to any of these sources are recorded in the calendar year in which the crime was reported. (Note: Not all local law enforcement or international agencies responded to our request for statistics or could provide the statistics as requested.)

The university may only exclude a reported crime from the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report or remove a reported crime from the previously reported statistics after a full investigation. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel can make a formal determination that the report was false or baseless when made and that the crime report was therefore “unfounded.” We have added a separate section to our Crime Statistics Table to include the numbers of crimes that were determined to be “unfounded.”

All of the statistics are gathered, compiled, and reported online at police.illinois.edu/clery.

A daily crime log is available online, and a hard copy is available for public review at the Public Safety Building at 1110 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana. The daily crime log is meant to provide information about crimes which have been reported in the university area during the previous 60 days. The daily crime log is not like a typical police blotter, and understanding how the information is compiled is important to developing an accurate picture of crime in the greater campus community.

If a crime report is determined to be “unfounded,” the university will update the disposition of the complaint to “unfounded” in the daily crime log. The university will not delete the report from the crime log.

 

Clery Act reporting descriptions

For purposes of reporting statistics, the university must distinguish criminal offenses according to where they occur. Geographic locations are defined as follows:

  • On-Campus: (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and (2) any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in the first part of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or retail vendor).
  • On-campus student housing: On-campus student housing is a subset of the on-campus category and is defined as any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or is located on property that is owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous geographic area that makes up the campus.
  • Noncampus Building or Property: (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.
  • Public Property: All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
  • Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, ethnicity, national origin, or disability. Clery crimes which also qualify as hate crimes are identified at the end of the chart. Beyond the primary Clery crime categories, additional categories for reporting hate crime data include larceny, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction, damage, or vandalism of property.
  • Referrals occur when a person is not arrested for liquor law violations, drug law violations, or illegal weapons possession, but is instead referred for campus disciplinary action. Referrals that were the result of arrest or criminal citation are reflected in the arrest section of the chart. Data reported on the number of individuals referred for campus disciplinary action are from the Office for Student Conflict Resolution and University Housing reports.
More:

To view maps of the university’s Clery geography, visit go.illinois.edu/NorthCore to see everything north of Windsor Road and go.illinois.edu/SouthCore for everything south of Windsor Road.

 

Classifying crime statistics

The statistics above are compiled and published in accordance with the standards and guidelines used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook, applicable federal laws and regulations, including the Clery Act as amended, and The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting 2016 Edition.

The number of victims involved in a particular incident is indicated for the following crime classifications: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, manslaughter by negligence, rape, fondling, incest, statutory rape, and aggravated assault. For example, if an aggravated assault occurs and there are three victims, this would be counted as three aggravated assaults in the crime statistics chart.

The number of incidents involving a particular offense is indicated for the following crime categories (includes one offense per distinct operation): robbery, burglary, larceny, and arson. For example, if five students are walking across campus together and they are robbed, this would count as one instance of robbery in the crime statistics chart. Attempted crimes also are counted.

In cases of motor vehicle theft, each vehicle stolen is counted.

In cases involving liquor law, drug law, and illegal weapons violations, each person who was arrested is indicated in the arrest statistics. If an arrest includes offenses for multiple liquor and drug law violations, it is only counted once in the category determined to be the most egregious offense.

The statistics captured under the “Referred for Disciplinary Action” section for liquor law, drug law, and illegal weapons violations indicate the number of people who are referred to the disciplinary system in the Office of the Dean of Students for violating those specific laws. These include referrals that resulted in disciplinary action being initiated by the Office for Student Conflict Resolution and a record of the action being kept on file.

Statistics for hate crimes are counted in each specific Clery Act-reportable crime category and therefore are part of the overall statistics reported for each year. In addition to those offenses, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism of property are reported only if they are hate crimes.

 

Definitions of reportable crimes

Murder and non-negligent manslaughter

The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

Manslaughter by negligence

The killing of another person through gross negligence.

Sexual assault (sex offenses)

Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

  1. Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. This offense includes the rape of both males and females.
  2. Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  3. Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  4. Statutory rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Robbery

The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated assault

An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.

Burglary

The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor vehicle theft

The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.

Arson

Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Liquor law violations

The violation of state or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.

Drug abuse violations

The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance. Arrests for violations of state and local laws, specifically those relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs.

Weapons (carrying of, possession, etc.)

The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.

Domestic violence

Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed (i) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; (ii) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; (iii) By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; (iv) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or (v) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Dating violence

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition, (i) dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse; (ii) dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Stalking

(1) Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (i) fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or (ii) suffer substantial emotional distress. (2) For the purposes of this definition, (i) course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property; (ii) reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim; and (iii) substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Hate crime

A crime reported to local police agencies or to a Campus Security Authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias against the victim. The categories of bias include the victim’s actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin, and disability. (Hate crimes include any of the following offenses that are motivated by bias: murder and non-negligent manslaughter, manslaughter by negligence, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism of property.)

Larceny-theft (except motor vehicle theft)

The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another.

Simple assault

An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.

Intimidation

To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Destruction, damage or vandalism of property

To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.

 

Reporting crime

Emergency lights

In this section…

 

Prompt reporting of a crime or emergency

Community members, students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to accurately and promptly report all crimes and public safety-related incidents to University Police or the appropriate police agency when the victim of a crime elects to, or is unable to, make such a report.

Call any of the following authorities, 24 hours a day:

  • Dial 9-1-1. Report emergencies or non-emergency criminal violations by dialing 9-1-1.
  • Dial 217-333-8911. Report non-emergency requests for police services by dialing 217-333-8911.
  • Emergency phones. For direct access to University Police headquarters, use any of the approximately 675 blue emergency phones located in walkways, buildings, bus shelters and elevators throughout campus.
  • Rape Crisis 24-Hour Hotline. Call the community Rape Crisis 24-Hour Hotline at 217-384-4444 to request crisis services.
  • Crime Stoppers. Report information about a crime anonymously by calling 217-373-TIPS, visiting 373tips.com or by downloading the P3 Tips mobile app.

For general information, contact the University Police Department at 217-333-1216 (non-emergencies), dial 9-1-1 (emergencies only), or use the emergency telephones located near residence halls, parking lots, and campus buildings. Any suspicious activity or person seen in the parking lots or loitering around vehicles, inside buildings or around residence halls should be reported to police.

Crimes should be reported to the University Police Department or a Campus Security Authority for the purpose of making timely warning reports to the community and for inclusion in the annual statistical disclosure.

Crimes involving sexual misconduct may also be reported to the Title IX and Disability Coordinator in the Title IX and Disability Office.

Amnesty for 9-1-1 callers

In general, it is the intention of the university and surrounding community public safety officials to support students who are taking steps to ensure others’ safety. Both Illinois state law and university procedures protect students from experiencing legal or academic consequences for certain violations, like underage consumption of alcohol, when they call 9-1-1 in an emergency. This protection applies to both the caller and the person in need of emergency assistance. These guidelines are intended to help students take appropriate action in high-risk situations by reducing students’ fear of legal or disciplinary consequences to the victim or themselves.

 

Campus security authorities

All Clery Act crimes reported to a Campus Security Authority (CSA) will be evaluated for the purposes of making timely warning notifications to the campus community and for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

A person may be a CSA if they fall into one or more of four categories:

  1. University Police Department sworn personnel and department administrators.
  2. Non-police people of offices responsible for campus security. These CSAs have security presence or access control authority on university property, including, but not limited to, security guards, student patrol officers, security staff at athletic events, and student ID checkers for the Division of Campus Recreation.
  3. Officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities. This category is defined broadly to ensure complete coverage and thorough reporting of crimes. To determine which individuals or organizations are CSAs, consider job functions that involve relationships with students. Look for officials (not support staff) whose functions involve relationships with students. An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the university. If someone has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, they are a CSA. Some examples of CSAs in this category include, but are not limited to: deans, student affairs professionals, student housing staff, athletic director/assistant directors, coaches, student activities coordinators, Title IX coordinator, student judicial officers, faculty/staff advisers to student organizations, director of the health center, victim advocates, and faculty/staff who lead university-sponsored overnight student travel.
  4. Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.

When a CSA is made aware of a Clery Act-qualifying crime, they are required to report it to University Police. CSAs need to gather incident information that would provide sufficient detail to properly classify the incident. CSAs should not investigate the crime or attempt to determine whether a crime, in fact, took place.

The Clery Compliance office within the University Police Department reviews CSA reports and makes a determination if an incident warrants timely warning and/or emergency notification of the university community and whether it is a reportable crime in the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. The Clery Compliance Coordinator will consolidate crime data from multiple sources, report qualifying crime data to the federal Department of Education, publish campus security reports and inform the campus community when and where Annual Security and Fire Safety Reports are available.

More:

For more information about Campus Security Authorities, visit police.illinois.edu/CSA.

 

How police respond to a report

In response to a call of a reported crime or an emergency, University Police will take the required action, either dispatching an officer or asking the victim to report to the Public Safety Building to file an incident report. All university incident reports are reviewed by the Detective Bureau, and when appropriate assigned to a detective for follow-up investigation and/or forwarded to the State’s Attorney’s Office for prosecution. University incident reports are also forwarded to the Office for Student Conflict Resolution for review and referral for potential action, as appropriate.

Additional information obtained via the investigation will also be forwarded to the Office for Student Conflict Resolution, as deemed appropriate. If assistance is required from the local police or fire departments, University Police will contact the appropriate department.

If a sexual assault or rape should occur, staff on the scene, including University Police, will offer the victim a variety of services. The University Police Department can provide Special Victims Unit detectives specially trained in evidence collection, trauma-informed interviewing techniques and other best practices.

 

Voluntary confidential reporting

We encourage anyone who witnessed or has been a victim of a crime to immediately report the incident by calling 9-1-1, or for a non-emergency, 217-333-8911. Police reports in the state of Illinois are public records, and University Police cannot hold reports of crime in confidence.

If you are the victim of a crime and you have questions, if you are uncertain or do not want to pursue action within the university or the criminal justice system, you may want to consider making a confidential report. Information disclosed as part of a confidential report will be maintained in a confidential manner to the extent allowable by law and will not be disclosed without your consent to anyone outside of the office to which it is reported. However, consent may not be required in limited situations, such as suspected child or adult abuse or neglect, court orders or subpoenas, or danger to self or others.

Some on-campus resources offer confidentiality, sharing options and advice. This privilege is limited to the Counseling Center, McKinley Health Center and the Women’s Resources Center. The latter is the designated counseling space providing confidentiality for survivors of sexual misconduct. Employees of McKinley Health Center and the Women’s Resources Center are Campus Security Authorities required to make disclosures about certain crimes to University Police, but those disclosures are not required to contain personally identifiable information. Persons making confidential reports to these organizations may authorize the disclosure of certain information about the incident to university authorities for inclusion in the annual crime reporting statistics.

Additional resources:

There is a variety of resources available for victims, and some campus units may provide their own in-house confidential resources. For more information about the available resources, please visit wecare.illinois.edu/resources.

 

Working closely with partner agencies

University Police maintain a close working relationship with the Champaign and Urbana police departments and the Champaign County Sheriff’s Office. University Police and the Champaign County Sheriff’s Office, Champaign Police and Urbana Police have mutual-aid agreements to provide each other routine and emergency police services, including assistance with criminal investigations. Each department assists during mutual investigations, arrests and prosecutions. University Police attend monthly meetings with local law enforcement agencies to exchange ideas and discuss problems that are of concern in the university community.

 

Resources

In this section…

 

Campus resources

Aside from police, you can seek help or additional information from:
* denotes confidential resource
 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
studentaffairs.illinois.edu
121 Swanlund Administration Building
601 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-1300
 

Counseling Center*
counselingcenter.illinois.edu
Turner Student Services Building Room 206
610 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-3704
 

McKinley Health Center*
mckinley.illinois.edu
1109 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana
217-333-2700
 

Women’s Resources Center*
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137
 

Title IX and Disability Coordinator
wecare.illinois.edu/titleix
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
844-616-7978
 

Housing and Residential Life
housing.illinois.edu
100 Clark Hall
1203 S. Fourth St., Champaign
217-333-7111
 

Office for Student Conflict Resolution
conflictresolution.illinois.edu
300 Turner Student Services Building
610 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-3680
 

Office of the Dean of Students
odos.illinois.edu
300 Turner Student Services Building
610 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-0050
 

Illinois Human Resources
humanresources.illinois.edu
202 Swanlund Administration Building
601 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-6677
 

Office for Access and Equity
oae.illinois.edu
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
217-333-0885
 

 

Campus counselors

Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors,” when acting as such, are not considered to be a Campus Security Authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

Counselors are defined as:

  • Pastoral Counselor: A person who is associated with a religious order or denomination, is recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign does not employ pastoral counselors.
  • Professional Counselor: A person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of the counselor’s license or certification.

The staff of the Counseling Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign encourages clients to report crimes to the University Police Department, which then compiles statistics in accordance with the Clery Act. The statistics are published in aggregate, which means they contain no identifying information or specific details about crimes.

Substance abuse resources

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is concerned about campus community members’ health and safety. Abuse of alcohol and controlled substances can seriously impair a user’s health and ability to work and study. It may also endanger the safety and well-being of others. For more information about substance abuse at the university, see the Alcohol, illegal drugs and substance abuse education section of this report.

If you need help:

Counseling Center’s Alcohol and Other Drug Program
206 Turner Student Services Building
610 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-3704

McKinley Mental Health Clinic
1109 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana
217-333-2700

Faculty/Staff Assistance Services
1011 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana
217-244-5312
24-hour crisis line: 217-244-7739

Rosecrance
2302 Moreland Blvd., Champaign
217-356-7576
24-hour line: 888-928-5278

The Pavilion
809 W. Church St., Champaign
217-373-1700

 
Support groups

There are no fees or dues for these groups, which meet anonymously to discuss and resolve attendees’ common problems:

Alcoholics Anonymous: 217-373-4200 (24 hours)

Alanon/Alateen: 309-827-7426

Narcotics Anonymous: 800-407-7195 (24 hours)

 

University Police

Officer Darren Lewis and K-9 Bane.
Officer Darren Lewis and K-9 Bane.

In this section…

 

Our mission, vision and values

The University Police Department aims to make the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign community a safer place to live, work, study and socialize.

Vision: To continue to be a leader in policing and public service to strengthen our position as an integral part of the university and the extended community.

Mission: Our duty is to promote a safe and secure environment where education, research, and public service can flourish.

Values: Our values are based on the ideal of community-based public safety:

  • Justice. We are committed to the administration of law and order based on the constitutional idea of justice where every person will be treated with dignity and fairness. We value our duty in safeguarding constitutional rights in serving and protecting our community.
  • Respect. We value human life, safety, and dignity and are committed to treating all persons with the utmost respect, compassion, and concern. As a foundation of our Division, we hold an attitude of respect, embracing the protection of worth, dignity, and the rights of those we serve.
  • Integrity. We value candor, honesty, and ethical behavior in our members and the trust of our community, holding ourselves accountable to the highest degree.

 

Police focus areas

Each patrol officer has ownership of a specific focus area on campus as part of the department’s community-based philosophy. Officers build partnerships with members of their focus areas and address safety and quality of life issues with the community. These efforts include working with the community to remove the opportunity for crime to occur.

 

Campus law enforcement authority and jurisdiction

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the flagship campus of the University of Illinois System. We have a safe campus, but no community is immune from crime. With a population of approximately 65,000, including undergraduate, graduate and professional students, faculty members, academic professionals and staff members, as well as our many visitors, criminal activity and emergencies may occur on campus.

Under 110 ILCS 305/7, University Police are peace officers and as such have all powers possessed by police in cities, and sheriffs, including the power to make arrests on view or warrants of violations of state statutes and city or county ordinances, except that they may exercise such powers only in counties wherein the university and any of its branches or properties are located when such is required for the protection of university properties and interests, and its students and personnel, and otherwise, within such counties, when requested by appropriate state or local law enforcement officials. University Police maintain mutual-aid agreements with other local law enforcement agencies, and its 65 officers are trained just as all other public law enforcement officers in the state of Illinois are trained.

In 2017, the University Police Department was recertified as an Illinois Law Enforcement Accreditation Program (ILEAP) accredited agency. Accreditation is the ongoing process whereby an agency evaluates policy and procedure against established criteria and has compliance with that criteria verified by an independent and authoritative body. This accreditation provides a promise to our community that we meet certain law enforcement standards to serve them well. The University Police Department was successful in obtaining a Level Tier II status. In 2012, the University Police Department became the first ILEAP-accredited department for a college campus.

University Police officers work with the Champaign Police Department, the Urbana Police Department, the Champaign County Sheriff’s Office, state and federal law enforcement agencies, and all appropriate agencies of the criminal justice system. These agencies routinely exchange crime-related reports and statistics and conduct cooperative patrols, special events, investigations, and special unit operations.

 

Off-campus crimes and University Police

University Police do not provide primary law enforcement services to off-campus residences or to sororities and fraternities, which are also considered noncampus locations. University Police maintain partnerships with both the Urbana and Champaign police departments and regularly respond to student code and law violations, regardless of the geographic location of the offense. Off-campus student violations of the law or student code are addressed by the Office for Student Conflict Resolution.

Criminal activity off campus

The Office for Student Conflict Resolution maintains close contact (daily during the academic year) with the Champaign, Urbana, and University police departments and the Champaign County Sheriff’s Office to monitor criminal activity involving students and student organizations. Administrative reports from the police departments are recorded in a memorandum format and copies of these memoranda are, if needed, forwarded to appropriate units for further action.

The university may pursue disciplinary action for off-campus violations of university rules regardless of whether the activity was criminal in nature. Reports of violations by students may be referred to the appropriate Subcommittee on Student Conduct, the Boards of Fraternity or Sorority Affairs, or the Office of Registered Student Organizations.

 

Campus Safety

Illini Union
Illini Union building.

In this section…

 

Security awareness and crime prevention programs

University Police attempt to prevent crimes from occurring rather than react to them after the fact. The goal of crime prevention is to eliminate or minimize criminal opportunities whenever possible and to encourage students, faculty, and staff to be responsible for both their own safety and the safety of others. During more than 30 summer orientation sessions for new students, and periodically throughout the year, students and their parents are informed about the types of crimes that occur on campus and prevention resources offered by University Police. In 2018, University Police, McKinley Health Center, Women’s Resources Center, Alcohol and Other Drug Office, Housing Division and other campus organizations provided presentations/workshops on personal safety, sexual assault prevention, residence hall security, bike/pedestrian safety, alcohol abuse prevention and self-defense. Information about safety classes and other programming provided by University Police is listed on its website at go.illinois.edu/PolicePrograms.

Summary of safety presentations and programs in 2018
Name of Program Date Held Location Held Number of Attendees Department Sponsoring Program
Quality Improvement and Risk Management Training 2018 Online 165 McKinley Health Center
Bloodborne Pathogens and Safety Training 2018 Online 179 McKinley Health Center
Fire Safety Training 2018 Online 182 McKinley Health Center
Respiratory Protection 2018 Online 182 McKinley Health Center
Suicide Identification, Prevention & Treatment 2018 Online 60 McKinley Health Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/9/2018 I-Hotel (1900 S. First St Champaign, IL 61820) 75 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/10/2018 Lincoln Hall Theater 150 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/12/2018 Bielfeldt 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/17/2018 University Laboratory High School 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/19/2018 136 Loomis Lab 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/21/2018 Activities & Recreation Center 32 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 1/23/2018 Counseling Center 9 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 1/25/2018 Counseling Center 13 Counseling Center
Fire Inspections 1/26/2018 Blaisdell-Saunders 30 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 1/28/2018 Campus Recreation auditorium 35 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/1/2018 ARC meeting room 3 35 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 2/2/2018 Counseling Center 9 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/3/2018 Women’s Resources Center 30 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 2/5/2018 Counseling Center 9 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/6/2018 Campus Recreation ARC auditorium 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/8/2018 101 Armory 70 Police Department
CR W4 Fire Inspections 2/9/2018 Townsend Hall 30 University Housing
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 2/9/2018 Counseling Center 12 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/11/2018 Campus Recreation ARC meeting room 3 40 Police Department
Suicide Prevention & Risk Assessment 2/12/2018 McKinley Health Center 26 McKinley Health Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 2/15/2018 Counseling Center 12 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/15/2018 Mumford Hall 221 50 Police Department
AOD Tabling 2/16/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 360 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 2/21/2018 Counseling Center 7 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/21/2018 Foreign Language Building 11 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/22/2018 Enterprise Works 14 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 2/22/2018 Wassaja Hall 20 Police Department
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 2/25/2018 Fraternities 15 McKinley Health Center
National Alcohol Screening Day 2/26/2018 Illini Union 217 Counseling Center
AOD in Latinx 2/26/2018 LRN Class Presentation 16
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 2/26/2018 Counseling Center 7 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 2/27/2018 Counseling Center 10 Counseling Center
Community Conversation: Internet safety 2/28/2018 Undergraduate Residence Halls 3 University Housing
Fun Official Safety Night 3/1/2018 Allen Hall 10 University Housing
Unofficial Program: Pancakes & Pjs 3/2/2018 Busey-Evans 25 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 3/2/2018 Monsanto Room, ACES Library 20 Police Department
General Alcohol Outreach 3/3/2018 6 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 3/5/2018 Public Safety Building 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 3/7/2018 ARC Meeting room 3 30 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 3/8/2018 2001 S First St, Ste 107 25 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 3/9/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 3/13/2018 Counseling Center 4 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 3/15/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 3/22/2018 State Universities Civil Service System 1717 Philo Road, Suite 24, Urbana, IL 12 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 3/26/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
General Alcohol Outreach 4/2/2018 Zeta Beta Tau Frathernity House 45 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 4/4/2018 Counseling Center 12 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/9/2018 Orchard Downs Community Center Child Community Center (510 George Huff Ct., Urbana) 30 Police Department
Alcohol Trauma 4/10/2018 12 Counseling Center
Adult R.A.D Self Defense Class 4/11/2018 Apartments 12 University Housing
Adult R.A.D Self Defense Class 4/11/2018 Orchard Downs 12 University Housing
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 4/11/2018 Counseling Center 13 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/11/2018 Orchard Downs Community Center 10 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/12/2018 Bevier Hall 132 50 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 4/13/2018 Counseling Center 9 Counseling Center
Safety Week: Bike Safety and Clinic 4/14/2018 Apartments 25 University Housing
Safety Week: Bike Safety and Clinic 4/14/2018 Orchard Downs 25 University Housing
General Alcohol Outreach 4/17/2018 45 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 4/17/2018 Counseling Center 7 Counseling Center
General Alcohol Outreach 4/23/2018 Theta Xi Fraternity 58 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/24/2018 Foellinger Auditorium 100 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/24/2018 100 Noyes Laboratory 50 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 4/25/2018 Counseling Center 6 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 4/26/2018 Counseling Center 6 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/29/2018 Gregory Hall 300 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/29/2018 Gregory Hall 300 Police Department
General Alcohol Outreach 4/30/2018 12 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/30/2018 Delta Delta Delta sorority 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 4/30/2018 Delta Delta Delta sorority 60 Police Department
Parenting Education Class 5/21/2018 Apartments 15 University Housing
Parenting Education Class 5/21/2018 Orchard Downs 15 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
RISE 6/9/2018 105 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 Police Department
RISE 6/18/2018 Plym Auditorium 136 Counseling Center
General Alcohol Outreach 6/20/2018 Siebel Center 30 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/20/2018 Digital Computer Lab 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 6/20/2018 Digital Computer Lab 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/16/2018 2001 Huff Hall 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/16/2018 Room 2 in College of Education 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/16/2018 2001 Huff Hall 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 7/16/2018 Room 2 in College of Education 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/8/2018 209 Illini Union 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/8/2018 Bromley Hall (910 S. Third St., Champaign) 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/8/2018 209 Illini Union 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/8/2018 Bromley Hall (910 S. Third St., Champaign) 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/9/2018 209 Illini Union 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/9/2018 80 Small Animal Clinic 15 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/9/2018 209 Illini Union 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/9/2018 80 Small Animal Clinic 15 Police Department
Campus Resources & Safety 8/10/2018 Wassaja Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board I: Campus Resources & Safety 8/15/2018 Blaisdell-Saunders Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources and Safety 8/15/2018 Taft Van Doren Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/15/2018 180 Bevier Hall 32 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/15/2018 180 Bevier Hall 32 Police Department
Bulletin Board: Campus Resources and Safety 8/18/2018 Babcock-Carr Unknown (passive program) University Housing
First Bulletin Board 8/18/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources & Safety 8/18/2018 Hopkins Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1 8/18/2018 Blaisdell-Saunders Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1 Campus Resources and Safety 8/19/2018 Allen Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board #1: Campus Resources & Safety 8/19/2018 Oglesby Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources & Safety 8/19/2018 Bousfield Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources & Safety 8/19/2018 Babcock-Carr Unknown (passive program) University Housing
BB Wardall 12: ISR Safety 8/19/2018 Wardall Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
BB1 Campus Resources & Safety 8/19/2018 Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 2 (Safety Information) 8/19/2018 Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources 8/19/2018 Nugent Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resources & Safety 8/19/2018 Bousfield Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Campus Resurces and Safety 8/19/2018 Oglesby Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
First Bulletin Board 8/19/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1–Campus Resources and Safety 8/20/2018 Allen Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
BB1 campus resources and safety 8/20/2018 Hopkins Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Safety 8/21/2018 Wardall Hall 30 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/21/2018 David Kinley Hall 400 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/21/2018 David Kinley Hall 400 Police Department
Bulletin Board 1: Campus Resources & Safety 8/22/2018 Taft Van Doren Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Room 66 Library 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Lincoln Hall 500 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 130 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 150 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Room 66 Library 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Lincoln Hall 500 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 130 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 150 Police Department
Campus Resources and Safety 8/23/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board I: Campus Resources & Safety 8/23/2018 Trelease Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
BB- Campus Resources and Safety 8/23/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Welcome Meeting 8/23/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence 60 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/23/2018 ILEAS 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/23/2018 306 North Wright Street, ECE Building, Room 3002 200 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/23/2018 ILEAS 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/23/2018 306 North Wright Street, ECE Building, Room 3002 200 Police Department
Bulletin Board 1: Campus and Resource Safety 8/24/2018 Oglesby Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Floor meeting 1 8/26/2018 Scott Hall 25 University Housing
First Floor Meeting 8/26/2018 Wassaja 30 University Housing
“Community Nuts and Bolts” (Fall Floor Meeting) 8/26/2018 Barton-Lundgren 20 University Housing
First Floor Meeting 8/26/2018 Snyder Hall 40 University Housing
Bulletin Board 1: Campus Resources & Safety 8/26/2018 Babcock-Carr Unknown (passive program) University Housing
BB1 Campus Resources and Safety 8/28/2018 Snyder Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1: Campus Resources & Safety 8/29/2018 Graduate Upper Division Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1: Campus Resources & Safety 8/29/2018 Sherman Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 8/30/2018 Counseling Center 14 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/31/2018 801 Psychology Building 38 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 8/31/2018 801 Psychology Building 38 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 9/5/2018 Counseling Center 14 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/8/2018 SDRP 2003 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/8/2018 SDRP 2003 20 Police Department
Fire Inspections 9/10/2018 Busey-Evans 46 University Housing
Evans 4 Fire Inspections 9/10/2018 Busey-Evans 48 University Housing
Fire Safety Inspections 9/10/2018 Busey-Evans 51 University Housing
Fire Inspection 9/10/2018 Busey-Evans 24 University Housing
Fire Inspections 9/10/2018 Barton-Lundgren 24 University Housing
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 9/10/2018 Counseling Center 10 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 9/14/2018 Counseling Center 10 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 9/17/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
FYCARE Class 9/20/2018 44 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/20/2018 Transportation Building rm 303 45 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/20/2018 Transportation Building rm 303 45 Police Department
Bulletin Board 5 (Alcohol and Drug Safety) 9/21/2018 Nugent Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board 1: Campus Resources & Safety 9/23/2018 Barton-Lundgren Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Alcohol Awareness Bulletin Board 9/23/2018 Bousfield Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board Alcohol and Drug Safety 9/23/2018 Scott Hall Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Alcohol and other Drug Board 9/23/2018 Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Bulletin Board #2: Alcohol and Other Drugs 9/23/2018 Taft Van Doren Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Hakuna M”Vodka 9/24/2018 Wassaja Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/24/2018 2001 S First, #208 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 9/24/2018 2001 S First, #208 20 Police Department
iSpy with Housing Hallmarks 9/25/2018 Graduate Upper Division 30 University Housing
iSpy with Housing Hallmarks 9/25/2018 Sherman 30 University Housing
First Floor Meeting 9/26/2018 Lincoln Avenue Residence 50 University Housing
Alcohol and Drug Safety and Awareness 9/26/2018 Babcock-Carr Unknown (passive program) University Housing
Marijuana and the Student Code 9/26/2018 BNACC 40 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 9/26/2018 Counseling Center 9 Counseling Center
Above the Influence 10/1/2018 OMSA 35 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 10/2/2018 Counseling Center 7 Counseling Center
Alcohol Bulletin Board 2 10/3/2018 Nugent Unknown (passive program) University Housing
General Alcohol Outreach 10/3/2018 CHLH 243 Class (Huff Hall) 55 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 10/5/2018 Counseling Center 2 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/8/2018 Chem Annex 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/8/2018 Alpha Omicron Pi 100 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/8/2018 Chem Annex 60 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/8/2018 Alpha Omicron Pi 100 Police Department
Women on a Mission- Self Defense Program 10/9/2018 Busey-Evans 20 University Housing
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 10/9/2018 Counseling Center 13 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/9/2018 ARC Meeting Room 3 12 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/9/2018 ARC Meeting Room 3 12 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/11/2018 Orchard Downs Preschool 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/11/2018 Orchard Downs Preschool 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/14/2018 4-H sorority 20 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/14/2018 4-H sorority 20 Police Department
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 10/15/2018 General Campus 73 McKinley Health Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 10/15/2018 Counseling Center 5 Counseling Center
Think Before You Drink 10/16/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs Unknown McKinley Health Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/16/2018 SDRP 75 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/16/2018 SDRP 75 Police Department
Halloween Safety 10/22/2018 Apartments 15 University Housing
Halloween Safety 10/22/2018 Orchard Downs 15 University Housing
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 10/23/2018 Counseling Center 7 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 10/24/2018 Counseling Center 13 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/24/2018 DPS Conference room 227 25 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/24/2018 DPS Conference room 227 25 Police Department
Make a Halloween Bag 10/29/2018 Apartments 30 University Housing
Make a Halloween Bag 10/29/2018 Orchard Downs 30 University Housing
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/31/2018 PAR (Blaisdell Floor 1) 3 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 10/31/2018 PAR (Blaisdell Floor 1) 3 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 11/1/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 11/7/2018 Undergraduate Residence Hall 73 McKinley Health Center
General Alcohol Outreach 11/8/2018 La Casa 25 Counseling Center
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 11/8/2018 Counseling Center 14 Counseling Center
Don t Get Super Smashed Bro 11/13/2018 Wassaja 27 University Housing
General Alcohol Outreach 11/13/2018 Wassaja Hall 13 Counseling Center
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 11/14/2018 Counseling Center 8 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 11/14/2018 Armory 432 50 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 11/14/2018 Armory 432 50 Police Department
Marijuana Information Class (MIC) 11/30/2018 Counseling Center 11 Counseling Center
General Alcohol Outreach 12/4/2018 Alpha Chi Sigma
Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively (CAAP) 12/7/2018 Counseling Center 10 Counseling Center
Police Safety & Security Presentation 12/11/2018 I-Hotel 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 12/11/2018 Foellinger Auditorium 100 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 12/11/2018 I-Hotel 40 Police Department
Police Safety & Security Presentation 12/11/2018 Foellinger Auditorium 100 Police Department
ACE IT 8/26/2018-10/19/2018 David Kinley Hall 8632 Counseling Center

Specific examples of crime prevention and awareness programs

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University Police Department offer a number of opportunities for students, faculty and staff to learn more about campus safety and how they can look out for themselves and others. Additionally, the university maintains a number of resources, programs and initiatives to prevent crime on campus. For example:

Community Police Academy

The Community Police Academy provides an opportunity for participants to learn about police operations, investigations, crime prevention and specialized units like K-9, bomb squad and SWAT, and it culminates with a police ride along so you can learn more about what officers do. The Community Police Academy is about building bridges and forming relationships around our common goal of keeping everyone safe. It is a four-week course involving one three-hour class per week and takes place on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus. It is free of charge and open to U. of I. students, faculty and staff.

The Law and You

This program provided by Crime Prevention detectives covers how to interact with law enforcement officials and offers guidelines particularly useful for middle and high school students, international students and college students.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Presentations

The bicycle and pedestrian safety program focuses on proper fit for bikes, rules of the road and riding techniques for campus and the surrounding area as well as laws that pertain to pedestrians.

De-escalating Communication

In this training on de-escalation communication, University Police provide front office staff with positive communication skills that will de-escalate situations that may not require police intervention. This is an important safety skill for all staff and students who work with the public.

Office Safety and Security

Crime Prevention detectives provide safety and security tips for your office or personal workspace. Learn how to avoid becoming a target of thieves and how to respond should you ever find yourself in an emergency situation.

Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.)

The Rape Aggression Defense system consists of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. The program is a comprehensive course for women. It begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance before progressing to basic hands-on defense training. R.A.D. is not a martial arts program. Courses are taught by certified R.A.D. instructors and provide a workbook/reference manual, which outlines the entire physical defense program for continuous personal growth.

Residence Hall Security Program

Crime Prevention detectives visit residence halls to discuss safety procedures with students. Information covered includes the types of problems that can occur in residence halls, along with safety and security tips for residence hall living.

New Student and Employee Orientations

This program is offered to any organization who wishes to provide safety and crime prevention information to any new employees or students. Currently the University Police Department is involved in the summer registration for all incoming freshman. However, some units may have specialized orientation sessions in which they would like to have a more in-depth view of safety on campus.

Faculty-Staff Firearms Safety Program

The University Police Department wants its campus community members who choose to own firearms at home to do so safely. The Faculty-Staff Firearms Safety Program gives those community members a chance to learn from trained police officers how to safely handle, store and use firearms.

Crime Prevention Unit

University Police support a crime prevention unit with sworn staff holding an increased level of expertise and training. This unit supports the overall department’s efforts in crime prevention, including coordinating presentations and serving as a resource on facility issues using Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) concepts. The unit is also responsible for analyzing crime trends so that the department can better respond to safety issues facing the campus.

Emergency Phones

The university has an extensive network of blue emergency phones located in all campus buildings, parking garages and many bus shelters. They are also located on streets and walkways across campus in the familiar lighted emergency kiosks. The phones are connected directly to University Police and are monitored 24-hours a day, 7-days a week, including all holidays. The phones can be used to request help, report a crime in progress, report suspicious activities, request a SafeWalks escort, or for any other type of emergency. When the call button is pressed, the call will be answered by an on-duty staff member. They will ask the caller to explain the situation and will send the appropriate help. Locations of the exterior emergency phones are listed at go.illinois.edu/ephones.

Lighting Committee

The Campus Lighting Committee is an important component of our efforts to provide a safe and secure environment, underscoring our commitment to the safety and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and the public. The committee is responsible for determining areas where supplemental lighting will enhance security and safety, developing recommendations for the placement of lighting and emergency telephones, and studying the campus’ long-term needs related to upgraded security lighting policies and practices.

Public Safety Advisory Committee

This committee was established to serve in an official advisory capacity at the university. The mission of the Public Safety Advisory Committee (PSAC) is to ensure that the Division of Public Safety remains responsive to the needs of the campus and local communities, and to provide administration and the Executive Director of Public Safety with regular input on issues surrounding crime and fear abatement, law enforcement, public safety, and emergency preparedness. The role of the PSAC is advisory and consulting, and should enhance Public Safety’s community-oriented public safety philosophy.

Administrative Clery Committee

This committee is comprised of the following university officials who meet to review the university’s Clery Act compliance efforts and make recommendations to the Clery Compliance Officer regarding the university’s Clery Act obligations: the Chancellor or his/her designee; the Dean of Students; the Senior Associate Chancellor for Human Resources; the Director of Student Conflict Resolution; the Associate Director of Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety; the Associate Chancellor for Public Affairs; the Executive Director of Public Safety; the University Counsel or his/her designee; the Director of Housing; the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs; and the Assistant Director for International Safety and Security.

Behavioral Intervention Team

The Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT) serves as the centralized body for discussion and action regarding students exhibiting aberrant, dangerous, or threatening behavior that might impact the safety or well-being of the campus community. The BIT, as outlined in the Campus Violence Prevention Plan, is founded on the principles of early intervention and proactive engagement to prevent violence and provide supportive services. Team members are committed to improving community safety through a proactive, collaborative, coordinated, objective, and thoughtful approach to violence prevention and supportive interventions.

Threat Assessment Team

The Threat Assessment Team (TAT) collects and reviews reports of behavior exhibited by anyone who may pose a threat to the university community. The team then determines the most appropriate action to mitigate the threat. The TAT includes members from Faculty/Staff Assistance Services, Illinois Human Resources, the Office of Access and Equity, the Office of the Chancellor, the Office of the Dean of Students, the Office of the Provost, the Office of University Counsel (advisory only), and the University of Illinois Police Department.

Bias Assessment and Response Team

Bias-motivated incidents are actions or expressions that are motivated, at least in part, by prejudice against or hostility toward a person (or group) because of that person’s (or group’s) actual or perceived age, disability/ability status, ethnicity, gender, gender identity/expression, national origin, race, religion/spirituality, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, etc. The Bias Assessment and Response Team (BART) collects and responds to reports of bias-motivated incidents that occur within the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign community.

SafeWalks

SafeWalks is a free walking escort service provided by trained Student Patrol officers for university students, faculty and staff so no one has to travel alone at night. By walking in groups, campus community members reduce their risk of being targeted by a criminal. SafeWalks can be requested by calling 217-333-1216. SafeWalks are available from 9 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. every night, and until 3 a.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

 

Personal safety tips

  • Trust your instincts. If you feel uncomfortable in a place or situation, leave right away and go immediately to an area with lights and people; call police if something seems odd, as officers are happy to assist.
  • Keep your doors locked, even if you are in the room. Do not allow people to follow you into secure locations. Request that a “tailgater” use his or her key or swipe card to gain entry.
  • Report any unusual or suspicious activity you witness. Even the smallest bit of information could prevent a crime and help protect yourself or others.
  • Use well-lit, high-traffic routes when walking around campus, especially at night. The shortest route isn’t always the safest.
  • Do not walk alone at night. Use SafeWalks instead.
  • Stay aware of your surroundings. Listening to music or using your phone can distract you from people or vehicles around you.
  • Seek training in viable self-defense techniques. Do not allow the opportunity for a crime to occur — avoid placing yourself in environments in which it’s easier for criminals to commit a personal crime.
  • If possible, let a friend or roommate know where and with whom you’ll be and when you’ll be back when you go out.
  • Carry a whistle or a personal alarm to alert others if you need help.
  • Lock your car doors and roll up the windows completely — even if you’re only parking for a moment.
  • If you choose to drink, drink legally and responsibly. Your ability to respond is diminished by overconsumption of alcohol.
  • Utilize crosswalks at all times and obey the signals at intersections when walking. Under Illinois law, as a pedestrian, you do not have the right of way until you establish yourself in the crosswalk. If you are crossing at any location other than a crosswalk, you must yield to vehicular traffic.
  • When driving, be aware of pedestrians and bicyclists and yield to them when required by law.
  • Update your contact information with Illini-Alert at emergency.illinois.edu to receive messages about critical safety issues on campus.

 

Security of and access to campus facilities

Most campus buildings and facilities are accessible to members of the campus community and visitors during normal hours of business – Monday through Friday, and for limited designated hours on Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. Facilities are maintained, and their security monitored, in the interest of the campus. Many cultural and athletic events held in university facilities, such as the State Farm Center and the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, are open to the public with the purchase of tickets. Other facilities such as the Illini Union Bookstore, libraries, and cafeterias are also open to the public.

Access to academic and administrative facilities on campus generally is limited to students, employees, and visitors for the purpose of studying, working, teaching, and conducting other university business. However, the academic buildings are open and accessible during normal business hours and often into the evening hours for classes and meetings, and visitors can access the buildings during those hours. Each academic building has established its hours based on the needs of specific academic departments. University Police provide random patrols of the non-residential facilities as time permits. All residential areas and exterior doors of university residence halls are locked 24-hours a day.

In 2019, there were 1,890 cameras on the security camera system. The majority of these cameras were funded by departments and units across campus. All of these cameras can be reviewed at the Division of Public Safety. The Division of Public Safety and Technology Services have completed a proposal to expand camera coverage into the greater Campustown area, especially focusing on areas such as the Green Street corridor and Sixth Street between Daniel Street and Green Street. This proposal includes maintenance and replacement costs that can stand as a standard across campus. The university is currently working with the cities of Urbana and Champaign in order to make this proposal a reality, both through policy and cost sharing. Cameras are being installed in parking lots, parking structures and university quads on an ongoing basis. As campus emergency phones are replaced, they will be upgraded with a new model that includes a security camera.

 

Maintenance of campus facilities

Facilities and landscaping are maintained in a manner that minimizes hazardous conditions. University Police regularly patrol the campus and report malfunctioning lights and other unsafe physical conditions to Facilities and Services for correction. Other members of the university community are helpful when they report equipment problems to University Police or to Facilities and Services.

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

University Police are often consulted on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles. University buildings are evaluated on an ongoing basis and when they are first designed to include thoughtful landscaping design, good lighting, security cameras, intrusion detection systems, door access control and other architectural and design features that can prevent crime.

 

Crime notices and emergency notification

An informed campus is a safer campus, which is why the university notifies the campus community of serious crime, emergencies and other public safety issues in a timely manner.

Timely warning notices

Timely warnings (named “Campus Safety Notices” at Illinois) are issued whenever a serious crime or series of crimes in locations covered by the Clery Act pose a continuing risk to students and employees. Campus Safety Notices may be issued for crimes required to be evaluated under the Clery Act. The decision to issue a Campus Safety Notice will be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on when and where the incident occurred, when it was reported and the amount of information known by University Police. Such notices shall be provided to students and employees in a manner that is timely, that withholds the names of victims as confidential and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences. For example, if an assault occurs between two students who have a disagreement, there may be no ongoing threat to university community members and a Campus Safety Notice would not be distributed. Cases involving sexual assault are sometimes reported long after the incident occurred, thus there is no opportunity to distribute a “timely” warning notice to the community. The university is not required to issue a timely warning with respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor.

University Police may also post Community Safety Notices — at the discretion of the Chief of Police or designee — for non-Clery crimes occurring on Clery Act geography; at the request of another law enforcement agency for a serious crime or series of crimes which occur within a reasonable proximity of the core campus; or when appropriate to share public safety-related information where there may be investigatory value in releasing the information. The Chief of Police, Deputy Chief of Police, police lieutenants and communications director are authorized to create and disseminate Campus Safety Notices and Community Safety Notices.

When issuing a Campus Safety Notice or Community Safety Notice, University Police send a mass email to all students, faculty and staff indicating a crime has occurred. In addition, the notice is posted on the Division of Public Safety website.

Emergency notification procedure

University Police officers and supervisors have received training in the Incident Command System and the National Incident Management System. When a serious incident occurs that represents an immediate threat to campus, the first responders to the scene are usually members of the University Police Department, Champaign Police Department, Urbana Police Department, Champaign Fire Department, Urbana Fire Department, Arrow Ambulance Service and/or Pro Ambulance Service. They typically respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the size, scale and seriousness of the incident, other university departments and other local or state or federal agencies could also be involved in responding. The local police and fire agencies work in cooperation and communicate with the university when situations reported to them may warrant an emergency response from the university.

If a situation arises that poses a verified, imminent or ongoing potential threat to the safety, security or health of students or employees, an Emergency Notification (named “Illini-Alert” at Illinois) will be issued to expedite emergency response and/or evacuation procedures. The goal of an emergency notification is to notify as many people as possible, as rapidly as possible, with adequate follow-up information as needed. Follow-up information will be available via use of the Illini-Alert emergency notification system (which employs text message, email, web alert, digital signs, Twitter and Facebook) on a case-by-case basis. Information critical to members of the larger community may be disseminated using additional mechanisms at the discretion of the Executive Director of Public Safety or designee. Additional mechanisms may include public media outlets, NOAA emergency alert radios, Comcast Cable channel 7 (UI-7), 217-265-UIPD and/or the telephone alert directory. Emergency notifications are issued for incidents such as an active threat, major hazardous materials release, major fire, extended power outage, infectious disease outbreak or a tornado that would directly impact campus.

The university has implemented a formal process that gives the on-duty University Police shift commander, Executive Director of Public Safety, and/or designee the authority to do the following:

  • Confirm a significant emergency or dangerous situation;
  • Develop the content of the notification. There is no way to segment only a portion of the campus community to receive these alerts.
  • Initiate some or all of the emergency notification systems to send an emergency message to the campus community.

The process also stipulates that an immediate emergency notification will not be sent if, in the judgment of authorities, the message would compromise efforts to assist a victim, or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency. It also authorizes the on-duty University Police shift commander, Executive Director of Public Safety, and/or designee to create and initiate the emergency notification. The Executive Director of Public Safety and/or designee may also consult directly with Public Affairs to ensure an immediate notification to the campus via the emergency notification mechanisms described here.

Mechanisms to disseminate an emergency notification include:

  • Illini-Alert (text, email, emergency Web alert, digital signs, Facebook, Twitter)
  • Public media outlets (radio, television and web-based print sources)
  • NOAA emergency alert radios (deliver an automated, recurring message to any NOAA weather radio programmed to receive alerts in Champaign County)
  • UI-7 (a scrolling message board on cable TV channel 7)
  • 217-265-UIPD (delivers an automated phone message to anyone who calls this number)
  • Telephone alert system (a pyramid telephone call schedule to all or portions of the campus faculty, staff and students)
Illini-Alert

All students, faculty and staff are encouraged to update contact information for the Illini-Alert emergency notification system by visiting emergency.illinois.edu.

For questions or problems concerning the Illini-Alert service, please contact the Technology Services Help Desk at 217-244- 7000 or consult@illinois.edu. Those not affiliated with the university can receive Illini-Alert messages on their phones by texting “IlliniAlert” to 226787.

An emergency notification, called an Illini-Alert, is defined as an alert sent to the campus triggered by a significant emergency or dangerous situation which is currently occurring on or immediately threatening the campus. There is no way to segment a specific portion of the campus community to receive these alerts.

Emergency contacts

Keep your emergency contact information updated to ensure we can find you or your loved ones in an emergency. Go to go.illinois.edu/helpme to update your address and emergency contacts with the university.

Then register your contact information with Illini-Alert at emergency.illinois.edu to receive messages about critical safety issues on campus.

 

Notification of a missing student

If a member of the university community has reason to believe that a student is missing, he or she should immediately notify University Police at 217-333-1216. They will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation.

After investigating the missing person report, should University Police determine that the student is missing and has been missing for more than 24 hours, the university will notify the student’s missing person emergency contact no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing. If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual, the university will also notify the student’s parent or legal guardian immediately after law enforcement has determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours. University Police will notify the appropriate local law enforcement agency or agencies within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing.

In addition to registering an emergency contact, students have the option to identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by the university in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours. To identify an emergency contact, visit apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice. After logging in, go to “Emergency Contacts” under the “Personal Information” tab.

A student’s missing person contact information will be registered confidentially and will be accessible only to authorized University of Illinois System and law enforcement officials in the case of a missing person investigation.

Note: Although the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 requires a system for allowing students residing in on-campus housing to identify a confidential contact if they are reported missing, the university has created a system where all students may register a confidential contact through the Office of the Registrar as noted above. This may also be completed on the Self-Service website at apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice.

For the full text of the Missing Student Notification Policy, visit http://studentcode.illinois.edu/article2_part8_2-801.html.

 

Emergency response and evacuation procedures

As required by federal and state law, the University of Illinois has a comprehensive emergency operation plan that details immediate response and evacuation procedures, including the use of electronic and cellular communication. The university’s Campus Emergency Operations Plan includes information about Incident Management Teams, university operating status parameters; incident priorities; shelter-in-place and evacuation guidelines; and overall command and control procedures. University departments are responsible for developing their own building emergency action plans and continuity of operations plans for their staff and areas of responsibility.

As a part of the comprehensive emergency operation plan for the university, regularly scheduled drills, exercises, and follow-through activities are conducted annually. All tests are documented with description of exercise, date, time and whether announced or unannounced. Appropriate after-action reports are completed and submitted to the state of Illinois for review pursuant to the Illinois Campus Security Enhancement Act. After-action reports detail lessons learned, and follow-up items are identified with responsibilities assigned to appropriate campus entities. The university’s Basic Emergency Operation Plan, which is compliant with the Illinois Campus Security Enhancement Act, is posted on the Division of Public Safety website to be used in conjunction with campus exercises. The university conducts an annual announced or unannounced test centering on procedures to test the university’s emergency response and evacuation procedures. A follow-up communication to the campus community publicizes the results of this test.

Evacuation drills are coordinated by University Housing. Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety and local fire departments are invited to participate. Drills are typically conducted each semester for all university residence halls to ensure that emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested at least twice each year. Students living in university residence halls are provided the locations of emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation. Residents are not told in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering locations on campus and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat.

In the case of a long-term evacuation, University Housing staff and/or first responders on scene will communicate information to students regarding the developing situation or any evacuation status changes.

The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of a fire or other emergency. At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on fire safety issues specific to their building. Prior to conducting drills, University Housing residents are provided a brochure with emergency evacuation information.

Additionally, evacuation routes are posted on the doors of residence hall rooms. During drills, occupants practice procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarms. In addition to educating occupants about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides the university an opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components.

Evacuation drills are evaluated by University Housing staff; Code Compliance and Fire Safety; and local fire departments to review egress and behavioral patterns. Reports are prepared by participating departments that identify deficient equipment so that repairs can be made immediately. Recommendations for improvements are also submitted to the appropriate departments/offices for consideration. The Urbana Fire Department witnessed four building fire drills in the spring 2018 semester and five building drills in the fall 2018 semester.

Students who reside in university residence halls receive information about evacuation and shelter-in-place procedures during their first floor meetings and during other educational sessions throughout the year. University Housing staff members are trained in these procedures as well and act as an ongoing resource for the students living in residential facilities.

 

Shelter-in-place procedures

There may be emergencies that arise that do not afford individuals the opportunity to evacuate. During these types of emergency situations, sheltering in place may be necessary. Sheltering-in-place means to stay inside a known, safe area to avoid adverse conditions in an exterior environment. Examples of emergencies where the shelter-in-place option may be necessary and/or preferred include severe weather or an active threat situation. This may also include a fire emergency for people with disabilities who are not able to leave the building on their own or if elevator control is limited during a fire.

Basic shelter-in-place guidance

If an incident occurs that does not present a safe opportunity to evacuate, find an immediate place of safety and stay there until it is safe to come out. This may include locking the door(s) or barricading the ingress/egress point(s) of the area you are occupying. It may also include covering the windows to decrease visibility of the occupied area.
If an incident occurs where a shelter-in-place option is not possible, leave the area immediately following the evacuation procedures for your building. Follow the directions of police and/or fire personnel if they are on scene of the incident.

How you will know to shelter in place

A shelter-in-place notification may come from several sources, including University Police (via the Illini-Alert emergency notification system), the Office of Public Affairs, other university employees or other authorities utilizing the university’s emergency communications tools.

How to shelter in place

If an incident occurs where sheltering-in-place is the best option, follow the below steps, unless instructed otherwise by emergency personnel. These steps should only be followed if safe to do so:

  • When you learn of the emergency, seek or remain in a safe location.
  • When you are in a safe location, secure and barricade any entry point with whatever you have around you — desks, chairs, or maybe a belt.
  • Stay in the safe area and remain quiet, unless making noise would be beneficial to your safety (for instance, in a rescue or recovery).
  • Stay away from objects which may lead to an injury.
  • Do not leave the area of safety until you are notified that the emergency is no longer a threat to personal safety.

 

Substance Abuse

Building column

In this section…

 

Alcohol, illegal drugs and substance abuse education

The information in this section is in accordance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989.

The University of Illinois is concerned with health and safety. Abuse of alcohol and controlled substances can seriously impair one’s health and ability to work and study. It can also endanger the safety and well-being of others.

The university promotes an environment that rejects substance abuse as an acceptable life style, informs campus community members about resources for preventing or treating substance abuse, and helps to influence healthy decisions about alcohol and other drugs. Campus community members should familiarize themselves with the university’s standard of conduct and disciplinary actions taken against students or employees who violate that standard (all outlined below).

Prevention of substance abuse is sought in several ways by:

  • Promoting accurate information on drug use
  • Encouraging healthy use of leisure time through recreation and other activities
  • Enhancing skills for dealing with stress
  • Working through campus leaders and influencers to establish a healthy environment
How drug use affects health

Adverse health effects can range from nausea and anxiety to coma and death. There are risks associated with the chronic use of all psychoactive drugs, including alcohol. A pregnant woman who uses alcohol, cigarettes or other drugs exposes her fetus to serious risks, including miscarriage, low birth weight and brain damage. Substance abuse may involve controlled substances, illegal drugs and alcohol — all of which pose a health risk. When drugs are used in combination with each other, their negative effects on the mind and body are often multiplied beyond the effects of the same drugs taken on their own.

Alcohol is the drug most frequently abused on college campuses and in our society. Even small amounts of alcohol significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car, increasing the chances of having an accident. Consumption of alcohol may be a factor in the incidence of aggressive crimes, including acquaintance sexual assault and domestic abuse. Moderate to large amounts of alcohol severely impair the ability to learn and remember information. Because alcohol is a depressant, very large amounts can cause respiratory and cardiac failure, resulting in death.

Marijuana impairs short-term memory and comprehension. It can cause confusion, anxiety and, for some, lung damage and abnormalities of the hormonal and reproductive system. Hours after the feeling of getting high fades, the effects of the drug on coordination and judgment remain, heightening the risk of driving or performing other complex tasks. Cannabis, a fat-soluble substance, may remain in the body for weeks, and overuse can cause paranoia, panic attacks or psychiatric problems.

Club drugs refer to a wide variety of drugs including MDMA (Ecstasy), GHB, rohypnol, ketamine, methamphetamine and LSD, and are often used at raves, dance clubs and bars. No club drug is safe due to variations in purity, potency and concentration, and they can cause serious health problems or death. They have even more serious consequences when mixed with alcohol.

Depressants such as barbiturates, Valium and other benzodiazepines, quaaludes and other depressants cause disorientation, slurred speech and other behaviors associated with drunkenness. The effects of an overdose of depressants range from shallow breathing, clammy skin, dilated pupils, and weak and rapid pulse to coma and death.

Hallucinogens such as LSD, MDA, PCP (angel dust), mescaline and peyote can cause powerful distortions in perception and thinking. Intense and unpredictable emotional reactions can trigger panic attacks or psychotic reaction. An overdose of hallucinogens can cause heart failure, lung failure, coma and death.

Narcotics like heroin, codeine, morphine, methadone and opium cause such negative effects as anxiety, mood swings, nausea, confusion, constipation and respiratory depression. Overdose may lead to convulsions, coma and death. The risk of being infected with HIV/AIDS or other diseases increases significantly if you inject drugs and share needles, and there is a high likelihood of developing a physical and psychological dependence on these drugs.

Stimulants like cocaine, amphetamines and others – can cause agitation, loss of appetite, irregular heartbeat, chronic sleeplessness and hallucinations. Cocaine and crack cocaine are extremely dangerous and psychologically and physically addictive. An overdose can result in seizures and death.

Tobacco, with its active ingredient nicotine, increases heart rate and raises blood pressure. The tar in cigarette smoke is a major cause of cancer and other respiratory problems. Carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke can promote arteriosclerosis, and long-term effects of smoking include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, heart disease and lung cancer.

 

Drug use by students and employees

The university is committed to maintaining a drug- and alcohol-free environment for its students and employees, in compliance with applicable federal and state laws. Students or employees who violate federal or state laws concerning the possession, use or sale of drugs or alcohol are subject to criminal prosecution, as University Police actively enforce these laws; those who violate university policies may also be subject to institutional sanctions.

No one under the age of 21 may store, possess or consume alcoholic beverages on any property under the control of the University of Illinois, including private certified housing. Persons of legal drinking age — 21 years of age or older — may possess or consume alcoholic beverages only in areas or at functions specifically designated or approved for such use.

The unlawful or unauthorized possession, use, distribution, dispensation, sale or manufacture of controlled substances or alcohol is prohibited on university property or as part of any university activity. Students will also be subject to disciplinary action for violations of the alcohol or drug policy that occur off campus or on private property. Employees or students who violate the policy may be disciplined in accordance with university policies, statutes, rules, regulations, employment contracts and labor agreements, up to and including dismissal and referral for prosecution. The university may contact the parents of students under the age of 21 for violations of the Student Code.

Under the federal Controlled Substances Act, marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance and is illegal. Consistent with that Act and the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act and the Drug Free Workplace Act, the university prohibits the unlawful or unauthorized possession, use, distribution, dispensation, sale, or manufacture of marijuana on University property or as part of any University activity. The passage of the Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act in 2019, which legalizes certain activities related to marijuana under Illinois state law effective January 1, 2020, does not affect federal law or the university’s marijuana prohibition.

In addition, the university’s marijuana prohibition applies to both recreational and medical use. That means having a medical marijuana registry identification card under the Illinois Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act does not allow you to use or possess marijuana on University property (this includes but is not limited to outdoor spaces, classrooms, and residential halls) or as part of any University activity.

Disciplinary actions of university employees

Employees are subject to disciplinary action – including discharge – for unauthorized consumption of alcohol on institutional time or property; inability to perform satisfactorily their assigned duties as a result of consuming alcohol; illegal or excessive use of drugs, narcotics or intoxicants; or unauthorized sale or distribution of drugs, narcotics or intoxicants.

If anyone has a problem with controlled substances or alcohol, they are encouraged to seek professional advice and treatment. Confidential help is available, and employees may obtain a list of counseling and assistance programs by calling Faculty/Staff Assistance Services at 217-244-5312 or visiting the website at humanresources.illinois.edu/fsas. In some cases, a supervisor may direct employees to request this information.

Drug and alcohol testing of university employees

Drug testing may be required in accordance with applicable laws, policies and contracts. For example, if an employee is engaged in work under a federal contract, that person may be required to submit to tests for illegal use of controlled substances as provided by the law or regulations of the contracting agency. If an employee performs safety-sensitive job functions that require possession of a commercial driver’s license as a condition of university employment, that person will be subject to alcohol and controlled substances testing as mandated by Department of Transportation regulations.

Drug or alcohol convictions in the workplace

If an employee is convicted of a drug or alcohol offense that took place at work, that person must notify a supervisor within five days. If an employee working on a federal contract or grant is convicted of a drug or alcohol offense occurring in the workplace, the university will notify the granting or contracting federal agency within 10 days of receiving notice of the conviction. Employees may be required to complete a drug rehabilitation program in order to continue employment at the university.

Violation of the drug policy by university students

Students who illegally possess, use, distribute, sell or manufacture drugs are subject to disciplinary action and may be dismissed from the university. The standard disciplinary response to students who are distributing illegal drugs is dismissal for no less than two years. For more information about the university’s drug policy, read §1-305 of the Student Code: studentcode.illinois.edu/article1_part3_1-305.html.

 

State laws on drug and alcohol use

In Illinois, it is against the law to sell or deliver alcohol to anyone under 21 or to any intoxicated person. Violations can result in fines of up to $1,000 and one year in jail. It is also illegal for a person under 21 to present false identification in an attempt to purchase alcohol. On-campus violations are strictly enforced by University Police, and additional penalties may be imposed:

  • The Secretary of State is authorized to suspend or revoke without a hearing the driver’s license or instruction permit of a person under 21 who has purchased or attempted to purchase alcohol from a duly licensed establishment or who has consumed alcohol on licensed premises.
  • Local liquor commissioners have the duty to report to the Secretary of State any conviction for a violation of the Liquor Control Act, or a similar provision of a local ordinance, prohibiting a person under 21 from purchasing, accepting, possessing or consuming alcohol and prohibiting the transfer or alteration of identification cards, the use of the identification card of another or a false or forged identification card, or the use of false information to obtain an identification card.
  • The Secretary of State is authorized to suspend or revoke the driver’s license or learner’s permit of any person convicted of violating any of the prohibitions listed above or similar provisions of local ordinances.

Substantial penalties exist in Illinois for the operation of a motor vehicle by a driver with a blood or breath alcohol concentration of .08 or greater. Arrests are also possible at lower alcohol levels if driving is impaired. The first offense can result in a $1,000 fine, incarceration for up to one year, and suspension or revocation of the offender’s driver’s license. Subsequent offenses entail penalties of significantly greater severity. Transporting open alcohol containers in a motor vehicle is also punishable under Illinois law.

Except as otherwise provided in the Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act [410 ILSC 705], the possession, sale and delivery of controlled substances is prohibited in Illinois under the Illinois Cannabis Control Act [720 ILCS 550/] and the Illinois Controlled Substances Act [720 ILCS 570/]. Under the Illinois Cannabis Control Act as amended by the Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act, courts can set penalties that increase in accordance with the amount of any substance containing cannabis in each case. In regard to both the Illinois Cannabis Control Act and the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, penalties vary with the amount of the drug confiscated, the type of drug found, the number of previous offenses held by the individual, and whether the individual intended to manufacture, deliver or possess with intent to deliver [720 ILCS 550/4 through 550/10] [720 ILCS 570/401 through 570/408].

 

Federal laws on drug and alcohol use

In addition to prohibiting the unlawful possession of controlled substances [21 U.S.C. 844], the federal Controlled Substance Act [21 U.S.C. 801 and following] prohibits the manufacture, distribution, or dispensation, or possession with intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense, of controlled substances [21 U.S.C. 841(a)]. The Act also prohibits the creation, distribution, or dispensation, or possession with intent to distribute or dispense, of counterfeit substances [21 U.S.C. 841(a)]. Individuals can be penalized on the quantity of confiscated drugs, the type of drug(s) found, the number of previous offenses by the individual, and whether the individual intended to manufacture, sell, or use the drug.

For additional information on federal drug trafficking penalties, visit the Drug Enforcement Administration website.

 

Substance abuse programs

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers a number of opportunities to learn more about substance abuse and resources available:

  • Challenging Alcohol Attitudes Positively
  • Marijuana Information Class
  • Self-Assessment Workshop

For more information, visit the Counseling/Services section of the Counseling Center’s website.

ACE IT Alcohol and Other Drug Peer Education Program

In an effort to provide a safe community for students, the university requires all first year students to attend ACE IT, an orientation program using interactive group discussion led by fellow students to examine what new students may encounter in the campus drinking culture.

In each workshop, students explore hot topics around drinking, drugs, and campus life with a group of other new students. Throughout the workshop, students have the opportunity to express their thoughts and hear what their peers have to say about drinking/drug situations, attitudes, and choices. Students also get a first look at the wealth of free services and resources offered by the Counseling Center and throughout campus.

Due to the Counseling Center’s innovative harm reduction approach, ACE IT does not lecture or preach abstinence. Our primary goal is to ensure all students stay safe, healthy, and succeed academically.

Alcohol and drug prevention and response program

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign promotes an environment that discourages substance misuse, informs university community members about resources for preventing or treating substance misuse and promotes healthy decisions about alcohol and other drugs. Learn more about the Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Response Program at odos.illinois.edu/alcohol-and-drug-program.

 

Sexual Misconduct

Take Back the Night march.
Take Back the Night march.

In this section…

 

Sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is committed to providing a safe and welcoming campus environment free from discrimination based on sex, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, stalking, sexual harassment, dating violence and domestic violence (collectively referred to as sexual misconduct). The university prohibits and will not tolerate sexual misconduct because such behavior is wrong and is traumatizing to those who experience it. Additionally, it violates the university’s institutional values, adversely impacts the university’s community interest and interferes with the university’s mission. The university also prohibits retaliation against any person who, in good faith, reports or discloses a violation of this policy, files a complaint or otherwise participates in an investigation, proceeding, complaint, or hearing under this policy. Once the university becomes aware of an incident of sexual misconduct, the university will promptly and effectively respond in a manner designed to eliminate the misconduct, prevent its recurrence and address its effects.

For a complete copy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign policy governing sexual misconduct, visit cam.illinois.edu/policies/hr-79.

 

Definitions

The following definitions are used in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Sexual Misconduct Policy. Federal definitions can be found in the section of this report titled "Definitions of reportable crimes".

Sexual misconduct

Sexual misconduct includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, stalking, dating violence and domestic violence.

Sexual assault

Sexual assault means any sexual contact that does not involve the knowing consent of the other person, including

  1. any form of sexual penetration without consent; and
  2. any intentional or knowing touching or fondling by either person, directly or through clothing, of the sex organs, buttocks or breasts of the other person for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of either person without consent.
Consent

Consent means informed, freely and actively given, mutually understandable words or actions that indicate a willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. A person can withdraw consent at any time. There is no consent when there is force, threats, intimidation or duress. A person’s lack of verbal or physical resistance or manner of dress does not constitute consent. Consent to past sexual activity with another person does not constitute consent to future sexual activity with that person. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity with another person. A person cannot consent to sexual activity if such person is unable to understand the nature, fact or extent of the activity or give knowing consent due to circumstances including without limitation the following:

  1. the person is incapacitated due to the use or influence of alcohol or drugs;
  2. the person is asleep or unconscious;
  3. the person is under the legal age to provide consent; or
  4. the person has a disability that prevents such person from having the ability or capacity to give consent.
Sexual exploitation

Sexual exploitation is the use of another person’s nudity or sexual activity without consent for the purpose of sexual gratification, financial gain, personal benefit, personal advantage or any other non-legitimate purpose. Sexual exploitation includes, but is not limited to:

  1. without the knowledge and consent of all participants, observing, recording or photographing nudity or sexual activity of one or more persons in a location where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy; allowing another to observe, record or photograph nudity or sexual activity of one or more persons; or otherwise distributing recordings, photographs or other images of the nudity or sexual activity of one or more persons; and
  2. sending sexually explicit materials of another person without consent of the recipient.
Sexual harassment

Sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual, sex-based, or gender-based conduct, whether verbal, written, electronic and/or physical in nature, that is either:

  1. (1) sufficiently severe or pervasive; and (2) objectively offensive; and (3) unreasonably interferes with, denies or limits a person’s ability to participate or benefit from educational and/ or employment opportunities, assessments or status at the university; or
  2. by a person having power or authority over another in which submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of education and/or employment opportunities, participation, assessments or status at the university.
Stalking

Stalking is two or more acts directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her, his or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress, and includes, but is not limited to, following, monitoring, surveilling or threatening a person; initiating or continuing contact with a person without consent; or interfering with or damaging a person’s property.

Dating violence

Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim, and the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of relationship, the type of the relationship, and the frequency of the interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Domestic violence

Domestic violence means felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by:

  1. a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the alleged victim;
  2. a person with whom the alleged victim shares a child in common;
  3. a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the alleged victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
  4. a person similarly situated to a spouse of the alleged victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois; or
  5. any other person against an adult or youth alleged victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois.
Retaliation

Retaliation means any action, or attempted action, directly or indirectly, against any person(s), who, in good faith, reports or discloses a violation of this policy, files a complaint, and/or otherwise participates in an investigation, proceeding, complaint, or hearing under this policy. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to harassment, discrimination, threats, job termination, adjustment in pay or responsibilities, or negative impact on academic progress. Actions are considered retaliatory if they have a materially adverse effect on the working, academic, or living environment of a person; or if they hinder or prevent the person from effectively carrying out their university responsibilities. Any person or group within the scope of this policy who engages in retaliation is subject to a separate complaint of retaliation under this policy.

The state of Illinois uses the following definitions:

Criminal Sexual Assault [720 ILCS 5/11-1.20(a)]

A person commits criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration and: (1) uses force or threat of force; (2) knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent; (3) is a family member of the victim, and the victim is under 18 years of age; or (4) is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim, and the victim is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age.

Sexual Penetration [720 ILCS 5/11-0.1]

“Sexual penetration” means any contact, however slight, between the sex organ or anus of one person and an object or the sex organ, mouth, or anus of another person, or any intrusion, however slight, of any part of the body of one person or of any animal or object into the sex organ or anus of another person, including, but not limited to, cunnilingus, fellatio, or anal penetration. Evidence of emission of semen is not required to prove sexual penetration.

Consent [720 ILCS 5/11-1.70]

(a) “Consent” means a freely given agreement to the act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct in question. Lack of verbal or physical resistance or submission by the victim resulting from the use of force or threat of force by the accused shall not constitute consent. The manner of dress of the victim at the time of the offense shall not constitute consent. (c) A person who initially consents to sexual penetration or sexual conduct is not deemed to have consented to any sexual penetration or sexual conduct that occurs after he or she withdraws consent during the course of that sexual penetration or sexual conduct.

Aggravated Criminal Sexual Assault [720 ILCS 5/11-1.30]

(a) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits criminal sexual assault and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist during the commission of the offense or, for purposes of paragraph (7), occur as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense:

  1. The person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon, other than a firearm, or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon;
  2. The person causes bodily harm to the victim, except as provided in paragraph (10);
  3. The person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person;
  4. The person commits the criminal sexual assault during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony;
  5. The victim is 60 years of age or older;
  6. The victim is a person with a physical disability;
  7. The person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim’s consent or by threat or deception for other than medical purposes;
  8. The person is armed with a firearm;
  9. The person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; or
  10. The person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense, and that discharge proximately causes great bodily harm, permanent disability, permanent disfigurement, or death to another person.

(b) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person is under 17 years of age and (i) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 13 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.

(c) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.

Predatory Criminal Sexual Assault of a Child [720 ILCS 5/11-1.40]

A person commits predatory criminal sexual assault of a child if that person is 17 years of age or older, and commits an act of contact, however slight, between the sex organ or anus of one person and the part of the body of another for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of the victim or the accused, or an act of sexual penetration, and: (1) the victim is under 13 years of age; or (2) the victim is under 13 years of age and that person: (A) is armed with a firearm; (B) personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; (C) causes great bodily harm to the victim that: (i) results in permanent disability; or (ii) is life threatening; or (D) delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim’s consent or by threat or deception, for other than medical purposes.

Criminal Sexual Abuse [720 ILCS 5/11-1.50]

(a) A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person: (1) commits an act of sexual conduct by the use of force or threat of force; or (2) commits an act of sexual conduct and knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent.

(b) A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person is under 17 years of age and commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age.

(c) A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is less than 5 years older than the victim.

Aggravated Criminal Sexual Abuse [720 ILCS 5/11-1.60]

(a) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits criminal sexual abuse and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist (i) during the commission of the offense or (ii) for purposes of paragraph (7), as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense: (1) the person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon; (2) the person causes bodily harm to the victim; (3) the victim is 60 years of age or older; (4) the victim is a person with a physical disability; (5) the person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person; (6) the person commits the criminal sexual abuse during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony; or (7) the person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim for other than medical purposes without the victim’s consent or by threat or deception.

(b) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 18 years of age and the person is a family member.

(c) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if: (1) that person is 17 years of age or over and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 13 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act; or (2) that person is under 17 years of age and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.

(d) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is at least 5 years older than the victim.

(e) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.

(f) A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age and the person is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim.

Sexual Relations Within Families [720 ILCS 5/11-11]

A person commits sexual relations within families if he or she: (1) Commits an act of sexual penetration; and (2) The person knows that he or she is related to the other person as follows: (i) Brother or sister, either of the whole blood or the half blood; or (ii) Father or mother, when the child, regardless of legitimacy and regardless of whether the child was of the whole blood or half-blood or was adopted, was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iii) Stepfather or stepmother, when the stepchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iv) Aunt or uncle, when the niece or nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (v) Great-aunt or great-uncle, when the grand-niece or grand- nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (vi) Grandparent or step-grandparent, when the grandchild or step-grandchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed.

Domestic Violence [750 ILCS 60/103]

“Domestic violence” means physical abuse, harassment, intimidation of a dependent, interference with personal liberty or willful deprivation but does not include reasonable direction of a minor child by a parent or person in loco parentis.

“Physical abuse” includes sexual abuse and means any of the following: (i) knowing or reckless use of physical force, confinement or restraint; (ii) knowing, repeated and unnecessary sleep deprivation; or (iii) knowing or reckless conduct which creates an immediate risk of physical harm.

“Harassment” means knowing conduct which is not necessary to accomplish a purpose that is reasonable under the circumstances; would cause a reasonable person emotional distress; and does cause emotional distress to the petitioner. Unless the presumption is rebutted by a preponderance of the evidence, the following types of conduct shall be presumed to cause emotional distress: (i) creating a disturbance at petitioner’s place of employment or school; (ii) repeatedly telephoning petitioner’s place of employment, home or residence; (iii) repeatedly following petitioner about in a public place or places; (iv) repeatedly keeping petitioner under surveillance by remaining present outside his or her home, school, place of employment, vehicle or other place occupied by petitioner or by peering in petitioner’s windows; (v) improperly concealing a minor child from petitioner, repeatedly threatening to improperly remove a minor child of petitioner’s from the jurisdiction or from the physical care of petitioner, repeatedly threatening to conceal a minor child from petitioner, or making a single such threat following an actual or attempted improper removal or concealment, unless respondent was fleeing an incident or pattern of domestic violence; or (vi) threatening physical force, confinement or restraint on one or more occasions.

“Intimidation of a dependent” means subjecting a person who is dependent because of age, health or disability to participation in or the witnessing of: physical force against another or physical confinement or restraint of another which constitutes physical abuse, regardless of whether the abused person is a family or household member.

“Interference with personal liberty” means committing or threatening physical abuse, harassment, intimidation or willful deprivation so as to compel another to engage in conduct from which she or he has a right to abstain or to refrain from conduct in which she or he has a right to engage.

“Willful deprivation” means willfully denying a person who because of age, health or disability requires medication, medical care, shelter, accessible shelter or services, food, therapeutic device, or other physical assistance, and thereby exposing that person to the risk of physical, mental or emotional harm, except with regard to medical care or treatment when the dependent person has expressed an intent to forgo such medical care or treatment. This paragraph does not create any new affirmative duty to provide support to dependent persons.

Domestic Battery [720 ILCS 5/12-3.2, 720 ILCS 5/12-0.1]

A person commits domestic battery if he or she knowingly without legal justification by any means: (1) causes bodily harm to any family or household member; (2) makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with any family or household member.

“Family or household members” include spouses, former spouses, parents, children, stepchildren, and other persons related by blood or by present or prior marriage, persons who share or formerly shared a common dwelling, persons who have or allegedly have a child in common, persons who share or allegedly share a blood relationship through a child, persons who have or have had a dating or engagement relationship, persons with disabilities and their personal assistants, and caregivers. For purposes of this Article, neither a casual acquaintanceship nor ordinary fraternization between 2 individuals in business or social contexts shall be deemed to constitute a dating relationship.

Stalking [720 ILCS 5/12-7.3]

(a) A person commits stalking when he or she knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that this course of conduct would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.

(a-3) A person commits stalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions follows another person or places the person under surveillance or any combination thereof and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to or of that person or a family member of that person.

(a-5) A person commits stalking when he or she has previously been convicted of stalking another person and knowingly and without lawful justification on one occasion: (1) follows that same person or places that same person under surveillance; and (2) transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to that person or a family member of that person.

(c) Definitions. For purposes of this Section:

  1. “Course of conduct” means 2 or more acts, including but not limited to acts in which a defendant directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, engages in other non-consensual contact, or interferes with or damages a person’s property or pet. A course of conduct may include contact via electronic communications.
  2. “Electronic communication” means any transfer of signs, signals, writings, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photoelectric, or photo-optical system. “Electronic communication” includes transmissions by a computer through the Internet to another computer.
  3. “Emotional distress” means significant mental suffering, anxiety or alarm.
  4. “Family member” means a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, or child, whether by whole blood, half-blood, or adoption and includes a step-grandparent, step-parent, step-brother, step-sister or step-child. “Family member” also means any other person who regularly resides in the household, or who, within the prior 6 months, regularly resided in the household.
  5. “Follows another person” means (i) to move in relative proximity to a person as that person moves from place to place or (ii) to remain in relative proximity to a person who is stationary or whose movements are confined to a small area. “Follows another person” does not include a following within the residence of the defendant.
  6. “Non-consensual contact” means any contact with the victim that is initiated or continued without the victim’s consent, including but not limited to being in the physical presence of the victim; appearing within the sight of the victim; approaching or confronting the victim in a public place or on private property; appearing at the workplace or residence of the victim; entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim; or placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim.
  7. “Places a person under surveillance” means: (1) remaining present outside the person’s school, place of employment, vehicle, other place occupied by the person, or residence other than the residence of the defendant; or (2) placing an electronic tracking device on the person or the person’s property.
  8. “Reasonable person” means a person in the victim’s situation.
  9. “Transmits a threat” means a verbal or written threat or a threat implied by a pattern of conduct or a combination of verbal or written statements or conduct.

(d) Exemptions.

  1. This Section does not apply to any individual or organization (i) monitoring or attentive to compliance with public or worker safety laws, wage and hour requirements, or other statutory requirements, or (ii) picketing occurring at the workplace that is otherwise lawful and arises out of a bona fide labor dispute, including any controversy concerning wages, salaries, hours, working conditions or benefits, including health and welfare, sick leave, insurance, and pension or retirement provisions, the making or maintaining of collective bargaining agreements, and the terms to be included in those agreements.
  2. This Section does not apply to an exercise of the right to free speech or assembly that is otherwise lawful.
  3. Telecommunications carriers, commercial mobile service providers, and providers of information services, including, but not limited to, Internet service providers and hosting service providers, are not liable under this Section, except for willful and wanton misconduct, by virtue of the transmission, storage, or caching of electronic communications or messages of others or by virtue of the provision of other related telecommunications, commercial mobile services, or information services used by others in violation of this Section.
Aggravated Stalking [720 ILCS 5/12-7.4]

(a) A person commits aggravated stalking when he or she commits stalking and: (1) causes bodily harm to the victim; (2) confines or restrains the victim; or (3) violates a temporary restraining order, an order of protection, a stalking no contact order, a civil no contact order, or an injunction prohibiting the behavior described in subsection (b)(1) of Section 214 of the Illinois Domestic Violence Act of 1986.

(a-1) A person commits aggravated stalking when he or she is required to register under the Sex Offender Registration Act or has been previously required to register under that Act and commits the offense of stalking when the victim of the stalking is also the victim of the offense for which the sex offender is required to register under the Sex Offender Registration Act or a family member of the victim.

(c) Exemptions.

  1. This Section does not apply to any individual or organization (i) monitoring or attentive to compliance with public or worker safety laws, wage and hour requirements, or other statutory requirements, or (ii) picketing occurring at the workplace that is otherwise lawful and arises out of a bona fide labor dispute including any controversy concerning wages, salaries, hours, working conditions or benefits, including health and welfare, sick leave, insurance, and pension or retirement provisions, the managing or maintenance of collective bargaining agreements, and the terms to be included in those agreements.
  2. This Section does not apply to an exercise of the right to free speech or assembly that is otherwise lawful.
  3. Telecommunications carriers, commercial mobile service providers, and providers of information services, including, but not limited to, Internet service providers and hosting service providers, are not liable under this Section, except for willful and wanton misconduct, by virtue of the transmission, storage, or caching of electronic communications or messages of others or by virtue of the provision of other related telecommunications, commercial mobile services, or information services used by others in violation of this Section.
Cyberstalking [720 ILCS 5/12-7.5]

(a) A person commits cyberstalking when he or she engages in a course of conduct using electronic communication directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.

(a-3) A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions, harasses another person through the use of electronic communication and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of [the Criminal] Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.

(a-4) A person commits cyberstalking when he or she knowingly, surreptitiously, and without lawful justification, installs or otherwise places electronic monitoring software or spyware on an electronic communication device as a means to harass another person and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of [the Criminal] Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person. For purposes of this Section, an installation or placement is not surreptitious if: (1) with respect to electronic software, hardware, or computer applications, clear notice regarding the use of the specific type of tracking software or spyware is provided by the installer in advance to the owners and primary users of the electronic software, hardware, or computer application; or (2) written or electronic consent of all owners and primary users of the electronic software, hardware, or computer application on which the tracking software or spyware will be installed has been sought and obtained through a mechanism that does not seek to obtain any other approvals or acknowledgement from the owners and primary users.

(a-5) A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, creates and maintains an Internet website or webpage which is accessible to one or more third parties for a period of at least 24 hours, and which contains statements harassing another person and: (1) which communicates a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, where the threat is directed towards that person or a family member that person, or (2) which places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, or (3) which knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of [the Criminal] Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.

(c) For purposes of this Section:

  1. “Course of conduct” means 2 or more acts, including but not limited to acts in which a defendant directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, engages in other non-consensual contact, or interferes with or damages a person’s property or pet. The incarceration in a penal institution of a person who commits the course of conduct is not a bar to prosecution under this Section.
  2. “Electronic communication” means any transfer of signs, signals, writings, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photoelectric, or photo-optical system. “Electronic communication” includes transmissions through an electronic device including, but not limited to, a telephone, cellular phone, computer, or pager, which communication includes, but is not limited to, e-mail, instant message, text message, or voice mail.
    • (2.1) “Electronic communication device” means an electronic device, including, but not limited to, a wireless telephone, personal digital assistant, or a portable or mobile computer.
    • (2.2) “Electronic monitoring software or spyware” means software or an application that surreptitiously tracks computer activity on a device and records and transmits the information to third parties with the intent to cause injury or harm. For the purposes of this paragraph (2.2), “intent to cause injury or harm” does not include activities carried out in furtherance of the prevention of fraud or crime or of protecting the security of networks, online services, applications, software, other computer programs, users, or electronic communication devices or similar devices.
  3. “Emotional distress” means significant mental suffering, anxiety or alarm.
  4. “Harass” means to engage in a knowing and willful course of conduct directed at a specific person that alarms, torments, or terrorizes that person.
  5. “Non-consensual contact” means any contact with the victim that is initiated or continued without the victim’s consent, including but not limited to being in the physical presence of the victim; appearing within the sight of the victim; approaching or confronting the victim in a public place or on private property; appearing at the workplace or residence of the victim; entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim; or placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by the victim.
  6. “Reasonable person” means a person in the victim’s circumstances, with the victim’s knowledge of the defendant and the defendant’s prior acts.
  7. “Third party” means any person other than the person violating these provisions and the person or persons towards whom the violator’s actions are directed.

(d) Telecommunications carriers, commercial mobile service providers, and providers of information services, including, but not limited to, Internet service providers and hosting service providers, are not liable under this Section, except for willful and wanton misconduct, by virtue of the transmission, storage, or caching of electronic communications or messages of others or by virtue of the provision of other related telecommunications, commercial mobile services, or information services used by others in violation of this Section.

(e) A defendant who directed the actions of a third party to violate this Section, under the principles of accountability set forth in Article 5 of [the Criminal] Code, is guilty of violating this Section as if the same had been personally done by the defendant, without regard to the mental state of the third party acting at the direction of the defendant.

(f) It is not a violation of this Section to: (1) provide, protect, maintain, update, or upgrade networks, online services, applications, software, other computer programs, electronic communication devices, or similar devices under the terms of use applicable to those networks, services, applications, software, programs, or devices; (2) interfere with or prohibit terms or conditions in a contract or license related to networks, online services, applications, software, other computer programs, electronic communication devices, or similar devices; or (3) create any liability by reason of terms or conditions adopted, or technical measures implemented, to prevent the transmission of unsolicited electronic mail or communications.

Dating violence

Dating violence is not defined in the Illinois Criminal Code.

 

Committees and task forces

These committees and task forces have been assembled to raise awareness about sexual misconduct, develop prevention strategies, educate campus community members, review campus policies and assure compliance with state and federal laws.

Title IX Advisory Committee

The Title IX Advisory Committee is chaired by the Title IX and Disability Coordinator and has representation from the Office for Access and Equity, the Office of the Dean of Students, the Office for Student Conflict Resolution, the Women’s Resources Center, the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University Police, Division of Intercollegiate Athletics, University Ethics and Compliance Office and the Office of University Counsel. The work of this committee includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Oversee the university’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX and its implementing regulations
  • Assess the campus climate around sex discrimination issues and identify the needs, issues, and trends
  • Review sexual misconduct related policies, practices, and procedures to ensure compliance and consistency with applicable laws, regulations, and agency guidance
  • Provide oversight and quality assurance for university reporting and response systems
Rape Awareness and Prevention Committee

The Rape Awareness and Prevention Committee is appointed jointly by the Senior Associate Chancellor for Human Resources and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. The work of the Committee focuses on, but is not limited to, the following areas:

  • Encouraging the development of educational programs designed to (a) enhance the knowledge of members of the campus community of appropriate measures of self-protection, including security precautions, self-defense, walking in groups in well-lighted areas, use of emergency and cellular phones, Safe Rides information, and escort services; and (b) dispel myths and alter attitudes that contribute to sexual assault in the community
  • Working with community leaders and service providers, in compliance with the Illinois Campus Security Enhancement Act (110 ILCS 12/), as amended, to reduce the number of sexual assaults and ensure a coordinated response both in terms of law enforcement and survivor’s services
  • Advising and assisting various units and agencies with the development, implementation, and assessment of awareness, prevention and intervention programs to address stranger and acquaintance sexual assault and other personal and campus safety issues
  • Becoming knowledgeable of the levels and patterns of sexual assault in the campus community, and alerting the campus administration to any possible trends or need for changes in educational programs, interventions or services
  • Promoting appropriate training of units and staff responsible for addressing sexual assault
Special Populations’ Student Health Concerns Committee

The mission of the Special Populations’ Student Health Concerns Committee is to promote balanced, healthy lifestyles among the diverse University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign community and to provide health and wellness information for typically underserved populations. Goals and objectives include:

  • Promoting dialogue with the university community on cross-cultural health issues and awareness;
  • Designing and implementing interactive programs that facilitate health awareness to the Urbana campus student community;
  • Providing translated health education materials in several languages to our target populations (14 health topics currently available in 8 different languages);
  • Providing illness prevention/health promotion programs through the offices of Student Affairs, ethnic group clubs and organizations and some selected academic units;
  • Providing valuable health information and related literature by providing links to national, regional, local and Big Ten health centers;
  • Maintaining the Multicultural Health Clearinghouse website with health information for special populations;
  • Engaging in activities that will encourage student involvement in health/outreach programs; and
  • Working with local health/social agencies and also providing desired services to the underserved, underinsured and underrepresented community members.
Sexual Misconduct Prevention And Response Task Force

The Sexual Misconduct Prevention And Response Task Force was formed to work toward improving coordination between community leaders and service providers to prevent sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking and to ensure a coordinated response both in terms of law enforcement and survivor services. The task force meets at least two times per year to discuss and improve:

  • Best practices as they relate to prevention, awareness, education and response to sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking;
  • The university’s comprehensive policy and procedures; and
  • Collaboration and information-sharing among our university, community-based organizations and law enforcement, including discussing memoranda of understanding, protocols or other practices for cooperation.
Consensual Relationship Policy Task Force

This task force is charged with evaluating the University’s policies regulating consensual relationships between faculty and students. The committee considers whether the campus ought to have additional policies specifically regulating these relationships; if so, what those policies should be; and where should they reside.

Faculty Sexual Misconduct Committee

The Faculty Sexual Misconduct Committee was formed to create an environment where everyone is able to work, teach, and learn free of sexual harassment and misconduct. The committee is charged to:

  • Review current policies, processes and practices, consider whether the campus should have additional policies specifically regulating harassment and misconduct, and, if so, what those policies should be;
  • Recommend what sanctions, remedies or other supportive measures should be available in case of policy violations; and
  • Identify norms and practices to govern confidentiality around investigations and findings.

 

Education and prevention programs

The university engages in comprehensive, intentional and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking that:

  • Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness or outcome; and
  • Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels.

Educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees, as well as ongoing awareness and educational initiatives for students and employees that:

  • Identify domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as prohibited conduct;
  • Define using definitions provided both by the Department of Education as well as state law what behavior constitutes domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking;
  • Define what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity in the State of Illinois;
  • Provide a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention. Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options and taking action to intervene;
  • Include information on risk reduction. Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence;
  • Include information regarding:
    1. Procedures victims should follow if a crime of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking occurs (as described in the “Procedures for reporting” section);
    2. How the university will protect the confidentiality of victims and other necessary parties (as described in the “Assistance for Victims: Rights and Options” section);
    3. Existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance, student financial aid, and other services available within the university and in the community (as described in the “Resources” section);
    4. Options for, available assistance in, and how to request changes to academic, living, transportation, and working situations or protective measures (as described in the “Assistance for Victims: Rights and Options” section); and
    5. Procedures for university disciplinary action in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking (as described in the “Adjudication of sexual misconduct violations” section).

Campus officials seek to encourage more people to talk about issues surrounding sexual violence and misconduct. The campus community has a longstanding history of engaging in much-needed discussion around those issues with its First Year Campus Acquaintance Rape Education (FYCARE) program, a sexual assault prevention workshop that has been mandatory for new students since 1996.

The university has developed an annual educational campaign consisting of presentations that include distribution of educational materials to new students; participating in and presenting information and materials during new employee orientation; presenting programs throughout the year including sessions such as: skits, residence hall speakers, poster series, web-based training programs, unit-specific consultations and select student-employee orientations.

AT ILLINOIS, WE CARE

The website at wecare.illinois.edu delivers important information about sexual misconduct support, response, prevention and reporting options to those who need it. The website has quick links for those who want to report an incident, those who want to talk to someone, those who want information about how to support survivors and even people who do not necessarily know what to do.

The website provides information about confidential and nonconfidential resources, university policies, disciplinary procedures, and frequently asked questions on numerous topics related to supporting survivors, reporting options, and prevention and education programs.

Primary prevention education for students

All undergraduate students are provided with the Sexual Assault Prevention for Undergraduates online training program. Sexual Assault Prevention for Undergraduates is an online education training program which uses evidence-based content for sexual assault prevention training. It addresses several key content areas, including healthy relationships, gender socialization, sexual assault, the importance of consent, and bystander intervention, in addition to laws and university policies. The training should be completed prior to the start of classes or early in the first semester.

Similarly, all graduate and professional students (including graduate assistants) enrolled in one or more classes on campus grounds are provided with the Sexual Assault Prevention for Graduate and Professional Students online training program. Sexual Assault Prevention for Graduate and Professional Students is also an online education training program that uses much of the same curriculum as the undergraduate course, but the content is designed for more mature students. The training should be completed prior to the start of classes or early in the first semester.

Regardless of undergraduate, graduate or professional student status, all new students are mandated to complete their respective training. New students who do not complete the training will have registration hold placed on their student account until such time as the training is completed.

The Illinois Preventing Sexual Violence in Higher Education Act mandates the university provide this sexual violence primary prevention and awareness training annually for all students who attend one or more classes on campus.

Additionally, the First Year Campus Acquaintance Rape Education (FYCARE) workshop is an interactive discussion on campus sexual assault required for all first-year undergraduates. National studies have shown that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men will experience an actual or attempted sexual assault during their undergraduate career. Perpetrators are most often acquaintances – friends, classmates or dating partners – of the victim. FYCARE focuses on the ways that all students can be involved bystanders and caring supporters who can look out for one another.

The program became mandatory in the fall of 1996, in large part due to a grassroots effort from students in response to campus events. Peer institutions frequently look to the FYCARE program as a model for similar programs. Regular evaluations find that FYCARE participants are affected positively in terms of their knowledge about rape and support for survivors. Each year, the FYCARE program undergoes revisions to stay on the cutting edge of sexual assault prevention research as well as the student needs of the university.

FYCARE workshops focus on the dynamics of sexual assault, ways to support a survivor, understanding consent and campus and community resources. The majority of workshops are held in residence halls. Trained peer facilitators lead students through an engaging discussion in a relaxed atmosphere, drawing upon their own experiences as students on this campus to keep the workshop informative and entertaining. FYCARE recognizes that sexual assault is a crime rooted in gender inequality, but also one that affects people of all genders.

In an effort to create and maintain a safe campus community, the university has mandated that all students attend a FYCARE workshop during their first semester on campus. Evaluations show that the vast majority of past attendees found the workshops beneficial. Because survivors of sexual assault on campus often reach out to their friends, partners and family members for support and understanding, the workshop is invaluable.

Primary prevention education for employees

The university strives to achieve and maintain equal opportunity, inclusiveness, equitable treatment and access to education, employment and services for all individuals. As part of this commitment, the university strictly prohibits the offenses of sexual assault, sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. As members of the university community, it is important that we are part of the solution, not the problem.

In the spring semester of each year, all university faculty, staff and extra help are instructed to complete mandatory online training. The training introduces university employees to terms, school policies and their responsibilities regarding sexual misconduct. The training is mandatory under the Illinois Preventing Sexual Violence in Higher Education Act. This training also provides employees with ways in which they can intervene as a bystander. This training program is included in the onboarding information for new employees.

As members of this university, it is up to us to create an environment in which interpersonal violence is unacceptable and survivors are supported.

Additional prevention and awareness programs

The Women’s Resources Center coordinates additional programming around the idea of bystander intervention and healthy relationships. Among those programs are:

  • ICARE engages students in bystander intervention. In this interactive workshop, students dialogue with peers about consent and sexually disrespectful behavior, understand what helps people intervene in sexually disrespectful situations and set a group norm in which sexually disrespectful behavior is recognized as a problem and active bystander behavior is promoted.
  • I Heart Healthy Relationships is a 60-90 minute peer-led workshop which leads students in a discussion about what healthy dating relationships entail, how to communicate effectively, what is needed and what should be avoided in a relationship, how to support survivors of domestic violence, and what support services are available on campus.
  • GUARD is a day-long seminar for students in fraternities and sororities about creating a safe campus which values consent, supporting survivors of sexual assault, and intervening in potentially dangerous situations.
Sexual misconduct awareness and prevention programs offered by the university in 2018

Note: In the “Prohibited Behavior Covered” sections, the following abbreviations are used: SA (sexual assault), DaV (dating violence), DoV (domestic violence), S (stalking).

Primary prevention and awareness programs for all new students

Name of Program Date Held Location Held Number of Attendees Prohibited Behavior Covered
Sexual Assault Prevention for Undergraduates training 01/01/2018 – 12/31/2018 Online 28,128 (all students received the training, including new students and returning students) SA, DaV, DoV, S

Primary prevention and awareness programs for all new employees

Name of Program Date Held Location Held Number of Attendees Prohibited Behavior Covered
Understanding and Preventing Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence 01/01/2018 – 12/31/2018 (as hired) Online 7,397 SA, DaV, DoV, S

Ongoing awareness programming

Name of Program Date Held Location Held Number of Attendees Prohibited Behavior Covered
Understanding and Preventing Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence 2018 (ongoing) Online 20,135 SA, DaV, DoV, S
With or Without Trigger Warnings: Teaching Sensitive Topics 1/11/2018 Huff Hall 40 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Housing Parapro Training 1/11/2018 Clark Hall 20 SA, DaV, DoV, S
DIA Student Services Symposium 1/12/2018 Hall of Fame Room, Bielfeldt 100 SA, DoV, DaV, S
FYCARE Facilitator Orientation 1/16/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 144 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 1/17/2018 University Laboratory High School 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Dish It Up: Students Standing GUARD: Creating and Implementing A Consent and Sexual Assault Prevention Program for Fraternities and Sororities 1/22/2018 Women’s Resources Center 54 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Panel Discussion 1/25/2018 Krannert Performing Arts Center 20 SA
AdvCARE Facilitator Orientation 1/26/2018 Women’s Resources Center 45 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Title IX Overview with Fraternity and Sorority Chapter Presidents 1/27/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 72 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 2/3/2018 Women’s Resources Center 30 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 2/7/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
GUARD Facilitator Training 2/11/2018 Women’s Resources Center 24 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 2/14/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 2/15/2018 Mumford Hall 221 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
GUARD Fraternity/Sorority Seminar 2/18/2018 Siebel Center 55 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 2/25/2018 Fraternities 15 SA
The Intersections of Eating Disorders and Trauma 2/27/2018 Counseling Center 23 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 2/28/2018 Women’s Resources Center 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Trauma-Informed Care (for Medical Students) 3/1/2018 OSF Medical Center 25 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 3/7/2018 Women’s Resources Center 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
GUARD Fraternity/Sorority Seminar 3/11/2018 Siebel Center 60 SA, DaV, DoV, S
CHLH 199B: CARE Class Panel 3/13/2018 Bevier 132 49 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 3/14/2018 Women’s Resources Center 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
CARE Class Service Provider Panel 3/15/2018 Classroom 30 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE Class Presentation: Common Trauma Responses 3/27/2018 Counseling Center 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 3/28/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Survivor Ally Training 4/3/2018 Counseling Center 9 SA
DIA Real Talk 4/3/2018 Athletics Tutoring Building 7 SA, DaV
Survivor Ally Training 4/3/2018 Women’s Resources Center 12 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Consent 101 4/3/2018 Women’s Resources Center 12 SA
Survivor Ally Training 4/3/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 15 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Counseling Center Paraprofessional Alumni Panel 4/4/2018 29 Psych Building 25 SA, DoV, DaV, S
LGBT Discussion about Reporting 4/4/2018 213 Union 12 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 4/4/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
LGBTQ and Title IX Reporting: What to Expect 4/4/2018 Women’s Resources Center SA, DaV, DoV, S
Interconnect: Sexual Assault Awareness and Safety for International Students 4/4/2018 Women’s Resources Center 18 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Illinois Student Government’s Sexual Assault Prevention Department Resources and Reporting Lunch Series 4/5/2018 Counseling Center 5 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Sexual Assault Prevention Panel 4/5/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 5 SA
Intersection of Title IX and Career Services 4/9/2018 Arcade Conference Room 25 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Interfaith Discussion on Healthy Relationships 4/9/2018 Wesley United Methodist Church 15 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Dish It Up: Masculinity & Sexual Violence: Men as Perpetrators, Survivors, and Change Makers 4/9/2018 Women’s Resources Center 46 SA, DaV, DoV, S
YES! Anything else is not Consent 4/10/2018 Counseling Center 12 SA
Chalk the Quad: End Street Harassment 4/10/2018 Main Quad 20 SA, S
YES!: Anything Else is Not Consent 4/10/2018 La Casa Cultural Latina SA
Survivor Ally Training 4/11/2018 Counseling Center 12 SA
Expressive Arts Group 4/11/2018 Women’s Resources Center 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
MHC’s 25th Annual Health Fair 4/11/2018 Illini Union SA, DaV, DoV, S
Survivor Ally Training 4/11/2018 Allen Hall SA, DaV, DoV, S
Mariah Coleman: Sexual Assault Awareness Event 4/11/2018 Parkland College SA
Survivor Ally Training 4/11/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 13 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 4/11/2018 Orchard Downs Community Center 10 SA, DoV, DaV, S
SAAM Resources & Reporting Series 4/12/2018 Women’s Resources Center 10 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 4/12/2018 Bevier Hall 132 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Alpha Phi Presentation 4/16/2018 Alpha Phi House 10 SA, DaV, DoV, S
INNER VOICES Social Issues Theatre presents: BREAK THE SILENCE Scenes addressing sexual assault, support, survival and speaking out 4/17/2018 Nugent Hall SA
Expressive Arts Group 4/18/2018 Women’s Resources Center 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
SAAM Resource Fair 4/18/2018 Parkland College SA
Sexual and Reproductive Justice for Native Women 4/18/2018 YMCA Wahl Room SA
It Happens Here 4/19/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 30 SA, DaV, DoV, S
INNER VOICES Social Issues theatre presents: BREAK THE SILENCE Scenes addressing sexual assault, support, survival and speaking out 4/19/2018 Saunders Hall SA
Let’s Taco ‘Bout Sex: Sexual Health Fair 4/19/2018 ARC 120 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Counseling Center Advisory Board: Sexual Assault Awareness, Trauma and Outreach 4/20/2018 Counseling Center SA, DoV, DaV, S
Stride for Survivors 4/20/2018 Lincoln Hall Theater / Main Quad 300 SA
Confidential Resources Tabling for Sigma Beta Rho 4/23/2018 Main Quad 12 SA, DaV, DoV, S
What Comes Next? Life as a Survivor 4/24/2018 Counseling Center SA, DoV, DaV, S
Survivor Ally Training 4/24/2018 Counseling Center SA
So This is a Text?! Dinner and Discussion on Healthy Relationships and Consent 4/24/2018 Illini Hillel Cohen Center for Jewish Life SA, DaV, DoV, S
Survivor Ally Training 4/24/2018 La Casa Cultural Latina SA, DaV, DoV, S
INNER VOICES Social Issues theatre presents: BREAK THE SILENCE Scenes addressing sexual assault, support, survival and speaking out 4/24/2018 Snyder Hall SA
Survivor Ally Training 4/24/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 1 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 4/24/2018 100 Noyes Laboratory 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 4/25/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
What Comes Next? Life as a Survivor. 4/25/2018 ARC Meeting Room #3 SA, DaV, DoV, S
9th Annual Feminist Film Festival + #MeToo #TimesUp Reception 4/25/2018 Lincoln Hall Theater 80 SA
SAAM Lunch at La Casa 4/26/2018 La Casa Cultural Latina SA, DaV, DoV, S
Take Back the Night 4/26/2018 Independent Media Center 60 SA, DaV, DoV, S
INNER VOICES Social Issues theatre presents: BREAK THE SILENCE 4/26/2018 Allen Hall SA, DaV, DoV, S
Conversation Cafe: #MeToo: Accountability and Sexual Violence Prevention 4/27/2018 Women’s Resources Center SA, DaV, DoV, S
I Wasn’t Asking for It: Gallery Showcasing Stories of Sexual Assault 4/27/2018 YMCA SA, DaV, DoV, S
It’s On Us Shabbat 4/27/2018 503 E. John Street SA, DaV, DoV, S
STEP OUT 4/29/2018 Gregory Hall 112 SA, DaV, DoV, S
INNER VOICES Social Issues theatre presents: BREAK THE SILENCE Scenes addressing sexual assault, support, survival and speaking out 4/29/2018 Allen Hall SA
Police Department Presentation 4/29/2018 Gregory Hall 300 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Relationship Issues 5/1/2018 Undergraduate Residence Hall 22 DoV,DaV
Expressive Arts Group 5/2/2018 Women’s Resources Center 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 5/9/2018 Women’s Resources Center 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 6/5/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 6/14/2018 Greg Hall 319 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 7/2/2018 Greg Hall 319 35 SA, DoV, DaV, S
ICARE for Chemistry 7/10/2018 Roger Adams Lab 30 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 7/16/2018 Room 2 in College of Education 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
After the Report: A Title IX Primer on University Response 7/31/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs room 2025AB 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Housing Training for RA/Mas 8/7/2018 Bromley Hall 80 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/8/2018 Bromley Hall 910 S. Third St Champaign 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
University Housing Parapro Training 8/16/2018 Nugent Hall 35 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Presentation to University Housing – Dining Services 8/17/2018 Illini Union ABC 200 SA, DoV, DaV, S
With or Without Trigger Warnings: Teaching Sensitive Topics 8/21/2018 Gregory Hall 45 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/21/2018 David Kinley Hall 400 SA, DoV, DaV, S
New Faculty Orientation Breakout Sessions on Title IX & Disability Office 8/22/2018 I-Hotel 20 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/22/2018 Lincoln Hall 500 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 130 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/22/2018 Gregory Hall Auditorium 150 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Police Department Presentation 8/23/2018 306 North Wright Street, ECE Building, Room 3002 200 SA, DoV, DaV, S
OSCR training for Subcommittee on Sexual Misconduct and SCSD 8/24/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs room 2003 12 SA, DoV, DaV, S
History Dept New Grad Student Cohort 8/24/2018 307 Gregory 11 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Taking the Perspective of ‘Survivor’: How Rape Myths and Language Impact Complainant Experiences 8/24/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 18 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Subcommittee on Sexual Misconduct 8/24/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 15 SA
FYCARE Facilitator Orientation 8/28/2018 Allen Hall 135 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Sexual Misconduct Training for “Foundation Year at Illinois” program 8/29/2018 411 Urban Outfitters Bldg 14 SA, DoV, DaV, S
FYCARE New Facilitator Training 8/29/2018 Women’s Resources Center 49 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 9/5/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 9/8/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs room 2003 20 SA, DoV, DaV, S
13 Reasons Why: Deconstructing Suicide & Rape Myths 9/10/2018 Women’s Resources Center 55 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 9/12/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 9/19/2018 Women’s Resources Center 9 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Relationships, Meaning of Intimacy and Cheating Behavior 9/20/2018 Psychology Building 25 DaV, DoV
GUARD Facilitator Training 9/23/2018 Women’s Resources Center 21 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 9/24/2018 2001 S First, #208 20 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 9/26/2018 Women’s Resources Center 6 SA, DaV, DoV, S
AdvCARE New Facilitator Training 9/27/2018 Women’s Resources Center 23 SA, DaV, DoV, S
AdvCARE Returning Facilitator Training 9/28/2018 Women’s Resources Center 25 SA, DaV, DoV, S
GUARD Fraternity/Sorority Seminar 9/30/2018 David Kinley Hall 83 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Positive Relationships 10/3/2018 Orchard Downs Community Center 26 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 10/3/2018 Women’s Resources Center 10 SA, DaV, DoV, S
AdvCARE Facilitator Orientation 10/5/2018 Women’s Resources Center 43 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Positive Relationships 10/5/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 20 DoV, DaV, S
Positive Partnerships 10/5/2018 Orchard Downs 20 DaV, DoV
Peace Jam 10/6/2018 Lincoln Square Mall 30 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Chemistry (CHEM 492) Graduate Course Panel Presentation: Sexual Misconduct 10/10/2018 Chem Annex 1024 60 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 10/10/2018 Women’s Resources Center 6 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Healthy Partnerships 10/11/2018 La Casa Cultural Latina 45 SA, DaV, DoV
Latinx/DVAM Lunch on Us 10/11/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 45 DoV
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 10/15/2018 General Campus 73 SA
Healthy Queer Relationships 10/16/2018 Allen Hall 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Home Truth Film Screening 10/16/2018 Parkland College DoV
Expressive Arts Group 10/17/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Home Truth Panel Discussion 10/18/2018 Parkland College DoV
#RelationshipGoals: What the Media Tells Us 10/21/2018 Lincoln Hall 10 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Dish It Up + Sweet Social Justice: Activating Allyship: Men’s Role in the Movement 10/22/2018 Women’s Resources Center 60 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Relationships in the Age of Apps 10/22/2018 Allen Hall 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
CHLH 199B: CARE Class Panel Fall 10/23/2018 Lincoln Hall 1066/1065 39 SA, DoV, DaV, S
I Heart Healthy Relationships 10/23/2018 Women’s Resources Center 21 SA, DaV, DoV, S
ICARE Bystander Intervention 10/24/2018 Illini Union 15 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Breathing Room: Reflections on Trauma, Sexual Violence, Power, Gender and the Now 10/24/2018 Foreign Language Building 40 SA, DaV
Expressive Arts Group 10/24/2018 Women’s Resources Center 6 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Developing Wellness and Respect in Your Relationships 10/24/2018 ARC 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Developing Wellness and Respect in Your Relationships 10/24/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 5 DaV, DoV
How Do I Live with This Person? Navigating Living Spaces and Communication 10/25/2018 Student Dining & Residential Programs 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Candelight Vigil 10/25/2018 Champaign County Courthouse SA, DaV, DoV, S
Real Relationship Stories Panel 10/26/2018 Asian American Cultural Center 33 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Global Engagement Lounge- Self-care 10/26/2018 Asian American Cultural Center 19 DoV
Health Relationships Discussion 10/29/2018 Phi Signma Sigma House 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Common Trauma Reactions 10/30/2018 Lincoln Hall 44 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 10/31/2018 Women’s Resources Center 9 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Resource Panel for Rhetoric Instructors 11/1/2018 Gregory Hall 50 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 11/7/2018 Women’s Resources Center 5 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Sex and Alcohol Workshop 11/7/2018 Undergraduate Residence Hall 73 SA
What’s Hot, What’s Not/What are We? 11/7/2018 Florida Avenue Residence Halls 80 DoV,DaV
Gender Course Discussion 11/9/2018 Altgeld 15 SA, DaV, DoV, S
What are We? 11/12/2018 Animal Sciences Lab (Kins) 61 DoV,DaV
Domestic Violence Discussion for Inner Voices 11/13/2018 Armory 6 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 11/14/2018 Women’s Resources Center 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Police Department Presentation 11/14/2018 Armory building in room 432 50 SA, DoV, DaV, S
Expressive Arts Group 11/28/2018 Women’s Resources Center 6 SA, DaV, DoV, S
GUARD Your Community with Skills to Address Consent, Supporting Survivors, and Bystander Intervention 12/1/2018 Association of Fraternity and Sorority Advisors Conference in Indianapolis 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 12/5/2018 Women’s Resources Center 8 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 12/12/2018 Women’s Resources Center 7 SA, DaV, DoV, S
Expressive Arts Group 12/19/2018 Women’s Resources Center 1 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE Workshops 1/21/2018 – 3/1/2018 Armory, Bevier Hall, Lincoln Hall 786 SA, DaV, DoV, S
AdvCARE Workshops (ICARE + I Heart Healthy Relationships 1/30/2018 – 5/1/2018 various 1400 SA, DaV, DoV, S
I Heart Healthy Relationships Workshops 10/19/2018 – 11/29/2018 various 132 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE New Facilitator Trainings 6/4/2018 – 6/19/2018 Women’s Resources Center 26 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE Workshops 6/4/2018 – 8/25/2018; 9/4/2018 – 10/18/2018 Armory, Bevier Hall, Burrill Hall, FAR, ISR, Lincoln Hall, Newman Hall, SDRP 8732 SA, DaV, DoV, S
ICARE Workshops for Marching Illini 8/20/2018 – 8/23/2018 Armory 370 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE New Facilitator Trainings 8/23/2018 – 8/24/2018 Women’s Resources Center 16 SA, DaV, DoV, S
FYCARE All-Facilitator Training 8/30/2018 – 8/31/2018 Women’s Resources Center 135 SA, DaV, DoV, S
ICARE Workshops 9/26/2018 – 12/5/2018 various 822 SA, DaV, DoV, S

Sexual misconduct resources

The University is proud to have multiple confidential resources for those who have experienced sexual misconduct. McKinley Health Center and the Counseling Center provide multiple forms of physical and psychological well-being services, while the Women’s Resources Center has staff designated as confidential advisers who are trained and dedicated to provide support and advocacy.
 
* denotes confidential resource

Campus

Counseling Center*
counselingcenter.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 206
217-333-3704

Women’s Resources Center*
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Champaign
Suite 202
217-333-3137

McKinley Health Center*
mckinley.illinois.edu
1109 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana
217-333-2700

Office of the Dean of Students
Student Assistance Center
odos.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-0050

Title IX and Disability Coordinator
wecare.illinois.edu/titleix
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
844-616-7978

Office of Student Financial Aid
osfa.illinois.edu
620 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-0100

International Student and Scholar Services
isss.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 400
217-333-1303

Office for Access and Equity
oae.illinois.edu
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
217-333-0885

Office for Student Conflict Resolution
conflictresolution.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-3680

University Police Department
police.illinois.edu
1110 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana
217-333-1216

Student Legal Services
odos.illinois.edu/sls
1401 W. Green St., Urbana (rm. 324)
217-333-9053

 
Community

Rape Advocacy, Counseling
& Education Services

cu-races.org
300 S. Broadway Ave., Urbana
Suite 154A
217-384-4444 (24 hours)
877-236-3727 (toll free)

Courage Connection
courageconnection.org
508 E. Church St., Champaign
DV hotline: 217-384-4390

OSF Heart of Mary
Medical Center

osfhealthcare.org/heart-of-mary
1400 W. Park St., Urbana
217-337-2000

Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance
lollaf.org
302 N. First St., Champaign
217-356-1351
877-342-7891 (toll free)

Champaign Police Department
champaignil.gov/police
82 E. University Ave., Champaign
217-351-4545

Urbana Police Department
urbanaillinois.us/police
400 S. Vine St., Urbana
217-384-2320

Carle Foundation Hospital
carle.org
611 W. Park St., Urbana
217-383-3311

 
State and national

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)
rainn.org
800-656-4673

Love Is Respect
loveisrespect.org
866-331-9474

Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault
ncadv.org

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
nsvrc.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline
thehotline.org
800-799-7233

East Central Illinois Refugee Mutual Assistance Center
ecirmac.weebly.com
217-344-8455

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
ncadv.org

National Stalking Resource Center
victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center

 

 

Procedures for reporting

VICTIMS’ OPTIONS

Victims have options regarding the involvement of law enforcement and campus authorities, including the option to:

  1. notify proper law enforcement authorities, including on-campus and local police;
  2. be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement authorities if the victim so chooses; or
  3. decline to notify such authorities

The university has procedures in place that strive to be sensitive to those who report sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. This includes informing individuals, in writing, about their right to file criminal charges, as well as the availability of counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal, student financial aid, visa/immigration assistance, and other services that can be found on and/or off campus. Information will also be provided in writing to the victim pertaining to remedies to prevent contact between a victim and an accused party, such as changes to housing, academic, transportation and working accommodations, if reasonably available. The university will make such accommodations, if the victim requests them and if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to University Police or local law enforcement. Students and employees should contact the Title IX and Disability Office located at 616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign. The office can be contacted by phone at 844-616-7978 or by email at titleixcoordinator@illinois.edu.

After an incident of sexual assault, domestic violence or dating violence, the victim should consider seeking medical attention as soon as possible at Carle Hospital or OSF Heart of Mary Medical Center. In Illinois, evidence may be collected even if you choose not to make a report to law enforcement. If you decide, at a later date, that you would like to prosecute, this evidence will be available. Hospitals in Illinois are required to notify the local police department that treatment has been given to a sexual assault victim. When possible, it is helpful that a victim of sexual assault not bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the bed/linen/area where they were assaulted if the offense occurred within the past 96 hours so that evidence may be preserved that may assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred/or is occurring or may be helpful in obtaining a protection order. Regardless of the ability to preserve evidence, this does not preclude the victim from obtaining medical, law enforcement or other support services. In circumstances of sexual assault, if victims do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care providers can still treat injuries and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted disease. Victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence are encouraged to also preserve evidence by saving text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, other communications, and keeping pictures, logs or other copies of documents, if they have any, that would be useful to university hearing boards/investigators or police. Although the university strongly encourages all members of its community to promptly report violations of this policy to the proper authorities, including on-campus and local police, it is the victim’s choice whether or not to make such a report and victims have the right to decline involvement with the police. The university will assist any victim with notifying police if they so desire. University Police may be reached directly by calling 217-333-1216, or in person at 1110 W. Springfield, Urbana, IL. Additional information about University Police may be found online at police.illinois.edu.

If you have been the victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, we recommend that you report the incident promptly to the Title IX and Disability Office at 616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign, by phone at 844-616-7978 or by email at titleixcoordinator@illinois.edu; and the University Police Department (if the victim so desires). The university will provide written information about resources, both on campus and off campus, including medical and mental health services, to persons who have been victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, and will apply appropriate disciplinary procedures to those who violate this policy. The procedures set forth below are intended to afford a prompt response to charges of sexual assault, domestic or dating violence, and stalking, to maintain confidentiality and fairness consistent with applicable legal requirements, and to impose appropriate sanctions on violators of this policy.

As time passes, evidence may dissipate or become lost or unavailable, thereby making investigation, possible prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining protection from abuse orders related to the incident more difficult. If a victim chooses not to make a complaint regarding an incident, they nevertheless retain the option to speak with the University Police or other law enforcement to preserve evidence in the event that the victim changes their mind at a later date.

If a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking is reported to the university, below are the procedures that the university will follow as well as a statement of the standard of evidence that will be used during any disciplinary hearing on campus arising from such a report.

Procedures and the standard of evidence used during any disciplinary proceeding on campus

Sexual Assault
(Preponderance of the evidence standard)

  1. Depending on when reported (immediate vs delayed report), university will provide complainant with access to medical care.
  2. University will assess immediate safety needs of complainant.
  3. University will assist complainant with contacting police if complainant requests AND complainant will be provided with contact information for police department.
  4. University will provide complainant with referrals to on and off campus counseling services.
  5. University will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures, such as housing changes, changes in class schedule, and “No Contact” directives between the parties.
  6. University will provide a “no trespass” directive to respondent if deemed appropriate.
  7. University will provide the complainant with a written explanation of the victim’s rights and options.
  8. University will provide written instructions on how to obtain a campus-issued and -enforced no-contact directive and/or an order of protection or no-contact order issued by a state court. University will also provide information about resources at wecare.illinois.edu.
  9. University will provide information with a link to the Sexual Misconduct Policy to complainant and inform the complainant regarding timeframes for inquiry, investigation and resolution.
  10. University will inform the complainant and the respondent of the outcome of the investigation, whether or not the respondent will be administratively charged and the result of the student conduct process. The respondent also will be informed of the result of the student conduct process.
  11. University will enforce the prohibition on retaliation against any person who, in good faith, reports or discloses a violation of, files a complaint, and/or otherwise participates in an investigation, proceeding, complaint, or hearing under the sexual misconduct policy.

Domestic violence
(Preponderance of the evidence standard)

  1. University will assess immediate safety needs of complainant.
  2. University will assist complainant with contacting police if complainant requests AND complainant will be provided with contact information for police department.
  3. University will provide written instructions on how to apply for an order of protection.
  4. University will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence.
  5. University will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate.
  6. University will provide a “no trespass” directive to respondent if deemed appropriate.

Dating violence
(Preponderance of the evidence standard)

  1. University will assess immediate safety needs of complainant.
  2. University will assist complainant with contacting police if complainant requests AND complainant will be provided with contact information for police department.
  3. University will provide written instructions on how to apply for an order of protection.
  4. University will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence.
  5. University will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate.
  6. University will provide a “no trespass” directive to respondent if deemed appropriate.

Stalking
(Preponderance of the evidence standard)

  1. University will assess immediate safety needs of complainant.
  2. University will assist complainant with contacting police if complainant requests AND complainant will be provided with contact information for police department.
  3. University will provide written instructions on how to apply for an order of protection.
  4. University will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence.
  5. University will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate.
  6. University will provide a “No trespass” directive to respondent if deemed appropriate.

 

Assistance for victims: rights and options

CONFIDENTIAL OPTIONS FOR VICTIMS

Victims have the right to a confidential adviser throughout, and prior to, the reporting process. Confidential advisers are available for support, advocacy and information related to the campus and community options and resources, and are available through the Women’s Resources Center.

Women’s Resources Center
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137

Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint or whether the offense is alleged to have occurred on or off campus, the university will assist victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights and options. Such written information will include:

  • The procedures victims should follow if a crime of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking has occurred;
  • Information on how the university will protect the confidentiality of victims and other necessary parties;
  • A statement that the university will provide written notification to students and employees about victim services within the university and in the community;
  • A statement regarding the university’s provisions about options for, available assistance in, and how to request accommodations and protective measures; and
  • An explanation of the procedures for institutional disciplinary action.
Victims’ rights under Illinois law
  • The right to be treated with fairness and respect for their dignity and privacy throughout the criminal justice process.
  • The right to notification of court proceedings.
  • The right to communicate with the prosecution.
  • The right to make a statement to the court at sentencing.
  • The right to information about the conviction, sentence, imprisonment, and release of the accused.
  • The right to timely disposition of the case following the arrest of the accused.
  • The right to be reasonably protected from the accused throughout the criminal justice process.
  • The right to be present at the trial and all other court proceedings on the same basis as the accused, unless the victim is to testify and the court determines that the victim’s testimony would be materially affected if the victim hears other testimony at the trial.
  • The right to have present at all court proceedings, subject to the rules of evidence, an advocate or other support person of the victim’s choice.
  • The right to restitution.
  • The rights and options of students who have experienced sexual misconduct are more fully explained at wecare.illinois.edu/docs/rights-and-options.pdf.
Orders of protection

DIFFERENT TYPES OF PROTECTION

If you are the victim of a crime or crimes, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will give you information about how to obtain a campus-issued and enforced or a state-issued no-contact directive and/or an order of protection.

If the offender is a student or faculty/staff member of the university, the university may issue its own no-contact directive. This means that the offender will not be allowed to be in verbal or physical contact with the victim. If the order is disobeyed, the offender may face academic discipline up to and including dismissal from the university.

Whether or not the offender is affiliated with the university, a victim may seek an order of protection from a state court. An order of protection issued by a circuit court judge will generally prohibit the offender from coming into direct or indirect contact with the victim. If the order is disobeyed, the offender will face criminal penalties. No-contact orders issued by a judge are different in that they are usually issued as a condition of bail in relation to a crime with which the offender has been charged.

Further, the university complies with Illinois law in recognizing orders of protection. Any person who obtains an order of protection from Illinois or any other state should provide a copy to University Police and the Title IX and Disability Coordinator. A complainant may then meet with a representative of the University Police Department to develop a Safety Action Plan, which is a plan for police and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or coming and going from campus. This plan may include, but is not limited to: escorts, special parking arrangements, providing a temporary cellphone, changing classroom location or allowing a student to complete assignments from home. The university cannot apply for a legal order of protection, no contact order or restraining order for a victim from the applicable jurisdiction(s). The victim is required to apply directly for these services. To obtain an order of protection, you can: ask your attorney to file in civil court; request an order with your divorce; request an order during a criminal trial for abuse; go to the Champaign County Circuit Clerk’s office and get papers to seek an order of protection for yourself, or contact the Women’s Resources Center, Rape Advocacy Counseling & Education Services (RACES) or Courage Connection to ask for assistance in completing the forms. The University Police Department will also, as warranted, contact the appropriate Threat Assessment Team and convene its membership as stated in the Campus Violence Prevention Plan in accordance with the Campus Violence Threat Assessment Policy.

The university may issue an institutional no-contact directive if deemed appropriate or at the request of the complainant or respondent. To the extent of the complainant’s cooperation and consent, university offices will work cooperatively to protect the complainant’s health, physical safety, work and academic status, pending the outcome of a formal university investigation of the complaint. For example, if reasonably available, a complainant may be offered changes to academic, living, or working situations in addition to counseling, health services, visa/immigration assistance and assistance in notifying appropriate local law enforcement.

How to be an active bystander

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it. We want to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list of some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, dial 9-1-1. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

  • Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are OK.
  • Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
  • Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
  • Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
  • Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, confidential advocacy services, or with legal assistance.

The Division of Public Safety, Rape Advocacy Counseling & Education Services, and the Women’s Resources Center have worked together to create an on-request program to address the ways that bystanders can intervene in situations where sexually coercive behavior might be occurring. Utilizing a format mixing multimedia, lecture, and discussion, the program aims to educate students about how the media and rape myths perpetuate a campus culture that condones sexual violence, as well as how students can intervene and stop the cycle.

The Women’s Resources Center provides ICARE, a 60- to 90-minute bystander intervention workshop offered to established groups and organizations on campus. In this highly interactive workshop, students dialogue with peers about consent and sexually disrespectful behavior, understand what helps people intervene in sexually disrespectful situations, set a group norm in which sexually disrespectful behavior is recognized as a problem and active bystander behavior is promoted, and learn a variety of intervention skills. The workshop is also highly customizable and is built specifically for group members to examine their values and how they can work together to end sexual violence.

Risk reduction

The only person responsible for rape is the offender. Knowing that in some instances sexual misconduct is perpetrated on a serial basis, the university is committed to providing the campus community with strategies to reduce the risk of being targeted by a potential perpetrator (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network):

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Try not to load yourself down with bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
  • Avoid becoming isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 9-1-1 in most areas of the U.S.).
  • Don’t leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
  • Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself.
  • At parties, don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
  • Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place immediately.
  • If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately by calling 9-1-1. Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).

If you need to get out of an uncomfortable situation, here are some things that you can try:

  • Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
  • Be true to yourself. Don’t feel obligated to do anything you don’t want to do. “I don’t want to” is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
  • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort discreetly.
  • Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
  • Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.
Title IX and Disability Coordinator

Reports of all domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking made to the University Police Department will automatically be referred to the Title IX and Disability Coordinator for investigation regardless of whether the complainant chooses to pursue criminal charges.

 

Adjudication of sexual misconduct violations

Whether or not criminal charges are filed, a person or the university may pursue disciplinary action for violations of the Student Code or university policies through the Student Disciplinary Procedures for students and through the Policies and Procedures for Addressing Discrimination and Harassment for employees. To file a complaint, students should contact the Office for Student Conflict Resolution and employees should contact the Office for Access and Equity.

Disciplinary process for students

CONFIDENTIAL OPTIONS FOR VICTIMS

Victims have the right to have a confidential adviser with them throughout the student disciplinary process. Confidential advisers are also available for support and advocacy prior to initiating a student disciplinary process, and are available through the Women’s Resources Center.

Women’s Resources Center
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137

Consistent with university policy, the disciplinary process will include a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution process transparent to the complainant and the respondent. Usually, the resolution of complaints of sexual misconduct are completed within 65 business days of the report, however the proceedings timeframe allows for extensions for good cause with notice to the complainant and the respondent of the delay and the reason for the delay. Investigators and hearing board members are trained annually on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and taught how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of the victim and promotes accountability.

  1. The complainant and the respondent each have the opportunity to participate in a disciplinary process that will be decided by a properly trained investigator and/or panel that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability;
  2. The complainant and the respondent will have timely notice for meetings at which the complainant or respondent may be present;
  3. The institution will allow for timely access for the complainant, the respondent and appropriate officials to review any information that will be used during formal and informal disciplinary meetings and hearings;
  4. The institutional disciplinary procedures will not be conducted by officials who have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the complainant or the respondent;
  5. The institution provides the complainant and respondent the same opportunities to have others present during an institutional disciplinary proceeding. The complainant and the respondent each have the opportunity to be advised by a personal advisor of their choice, at their expense, at any stage of the process and to be accompanied by that advisor at any meeting or proceeding. An advisor may only consult and advise his or her advisee, but not speak for the advisee at any meeting;
  6. A student conduct decision is based on the preponderance of the information standard, i.e. “more likely than not to have occurred” standard. In other words, the conduct process asks: “is it more likely than not that the respondent violated the university’s Student Code?”
  7. The complainant and the respondent will be notified simultaneously in writing of the result of any disciplinary proceeding, as well as any changes to those results or disciplinary actions prior to the time that such results become final; and
  8. The complainant and the respondent each have the right to appeal the outcome of the proceeding by filing a written appeal within five days of the written decision and will be notified simultaneously in writing of any change to the result prior to the time that it becomes final and of the final result after the appeal is resolved.

When a complainant does not consent to the disclosure of his or her name or other identifiable information to the alleged perpetrator, the university’s ability to respond to the complaint may be limited.

Adjudication of violations for student discipline

If the respondent is a student, Appendix D of the Student Disciplinary Procedures governs the adjudication of violations of the Sexual Misconduct Policy. You may view the Student Disciplinary Procedures at conflictresolution.illinois.edu/policies/student-discipline. The Student Code can be accessed at studentcode.illinois.edu.
The major steps in the policy are:

  1. The Office for Student Conflict Resolution (OSCR) receives information of possible code violations from many sources including local and University Police, faculty, staff, and students.
  2. If necessary or appropriate, the complainant is invited to meet with a properly trained OSCR investigator to discuss the nature of the incident and their willingness to participate in the process.
  3. The OSCR investigator determines whether, if substantiated, the allegations would constitute a violation of the Student Code. If so, an Incident report is created and staff in OSCR determine appropriate charges.
  4. An allegation notice requiring a meeting is sent to the student alleged to have violated the Student Code (hereafter referred to as the respondent).
  5. The OSCR investigator meets with the respondent, complainant, and relevant witnesses to gather statements, documents, and information.
  6. The OSCR investigator compiles an evidence packet and affords both the complainant and the respondent an opportunity to respond to this information. The OSCR investigator then compiles an investigative report. Both the complainant and the respondent are again afforded the opportunity to respond.
  7. The OSCR director appoints three members of the Subcommittee on Sexual Misconduct to serve on a Panel, which then review the evidence packet and investigative report. Panel members are faculty, staff, and students who have no prior history with the parties that could result in substantial bias.
  8. OSCR staff schedule a formal hearing in which the respondent, the complainant, and witnesses are invited to participate. At this hearing, the Panel questions participants and determines the facts of the case. If the Panel finds that the respondent is responsible for violating the Student Code, the Panel will also assign sanctions. Written notice of the outcome is provided to both parties.
  9. Disciplinary decisions are subject to appeal by the respondent, the complainant, and the Dean of Students. Appeals are heard by appropriately trained members of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline. Decisions reached by the Senate Committee are final.

The anticipated timelines are:

  1. Cases are charged within 1 to 2 business days of the investigators’ determination that a formal investigation is warranted.
  2. Investigations will occur promptly and will vary depending on the complexity of the incident, the availability of important information and documents, and the cooperation of the parties and witnesses. This may take 10-40 business days.
  3. Both parties will have 10 business days to review and respond to the evidence packet.
  4. Both parties will have 5 business days to review and respond to the investigative report.
  5. Panel members will typically have 5-10 business days to review the evidence packet and investigative report before the formal hearing. And both the respondent and the complainant will be notified of the formal hearing at least 7 business days in advance.
  6. Appeals must be filed within 5 business days of the decision letter. Appeal hearings will occur promptly, but require assembling a committee and providing sufficient opportunity for review. This may take 8-15 business days.
  7. Usually the complaint will be resolved within 65 business days of the report; however, depending upon the academic calendar, these timeframes may need to be lengthened.

The decision making process includes:

  1. Decisions in the student disciplinary process are made based on the preponderance of the information standard. All relevant information is considered and weighed.
  2. Both parties may provide all relevant information to OSCR for review and consideration.

Sanctions
The Student Disciplinary Process will assign both formal and educational/behavioral sanctions.

  1. Formal sanctions: University Reprimand, University Censure, Conduct Probation, Suspension, Dismissal, and Dismissal Held in Abeyance. The record of the formal sanctions is maintained according to a specific records retention policy depending on the sanction. Suspension and Dismissal are noted on the academic transcript for the duration of the sanction.
  2. Educational/Behavioral sanctions for any violation of the Student Code: No contact directives, no trespass orders, violence prevention programs, workshops on ethical decision making, meetings with mentors or disciplinary officers, research papers, letters of apology, personal journal reviews with a disciplinary officer, reflective essays, policy review essays, educational interviews, substance abuse assessments and programs, drug testing, topic-focused discussions with licensed professionals, mandated service to the community, and other educational projects.
Disciplinary process for employees

As set forth in its Nondiscrimination Policy and Sexual Misconduct Policy, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is committed to ensuring that its learning and working environments are free from all forms of discrimination and harassment. These Procedural Guidelines apply to alleged violations of the University Nondiscrimination Policy and Sexual Misconduct Policy and may be invoked by students, applicants, visitors, faculty, staff, employees, or former employees of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

For complaints outside of the Nondiscrimination Policy or Sexual Misconduct Policy, students or employees may have access to other resources or problem-solving processes on campus, including those offered through their units, the Office for Student Conflict Resolution, the Faculty Advisory Committee or the Professional Advisory Committee, and negotiated grievance procedures in collective bargaining agreements. Investigations under these Procedural Guidelines may be implemented irrespective of any criminal proceeding or administrative action pursued in accordance with applicable departmental or University policies.

Adjudication of violations for employee discrimination and harassment violations

If the respondent is an employee, the Policy and Procedures for Addressing Discrimination and Harassment at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the applicable policy which governs the adjudication of violations. It can be accessed at oae.illinois.edu/complaint_procedures.pdf.
The major steps in the policy are:

CONFIDENTIAL OPTIONS FOR VICTIMS

Victims have the right to have a confidential adviser with them throughout the OAE process. Confidential advisers are also available for support and advocacy prior to filing with OAE, and are available through the Women’s Resources Center.

Women’s Resources Center
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137

  1. Office for Access and Equity receives information of possible policy violations from complainant, supervisor or university unit.
  2. The Office for Access and Equity will determine the most effective method of investigating alleged violations of the Nondiscrimination Policy and the Sexual Misconduct Policy. In the normal course, an investigation will include (a) interviewing the complainant, the respondent(s), and any other relevant individuals and witnesses, (b) reviewing written statements, documents, records, and other relevant evidence, and (c) a report will be issued.
  3. The complainant and the respondent each have the right to file an appeal to a three-person appeals panel based on one or more of the following reasons:
    • New evidence has become available which is sufficient to alter the decision, and the person filing the appeal was not aware of the new evidence during the investigation, or the new evidence could not have been reasonably obtained at the time of the investigation. A party who affirmatively elects to not participate in the investigation will not be able to introduce new evidence at the time of appeal.
    • There were procedural errors that had a material impact on the fairness of the investigation.
    • The conclusion is not supported by the findings or the findings are not supported by the evidence in light of the whole record.

The appeal must be submitted in writing with all supporting materials attached.

The anticipated timelines are:

  1. The investigator shall issue an investigation report for a formal investigation within 60 calendar days from the date the complainant meets with the investigator and determines to move forward with the formal process or from the date that a formal investigation is initiated by the Office for Access and Equity in the event that no formal complaint has been filed. Extensions may be sought from the Director of the Office for Access and Equity and will be granted when necessary to ensure a thorough investigation. Extensions are requested, granted or disapproved in writing, and simultaneous written notice will be provided to all parties involved.
  2. After the issuance of the final report, the investigator will convene a meeting with the department head, human resources, legal counsel, and the provost’s office (when investigations involve faculty respondents). Within ten (10) days of the meeting, the department head shall submit a written response to OAE’s findings and recommendations. If this communication is not received within ten (10) days and no extension is requested, then the report will be deemed to be accepted by the respondent’s department. The complainant and the respondent will simultaneously receive a written copy of the departmental response.
  3. The complainant and the respondent each have the right to appeal the findings of the investigation. If the complainant or respondent decides to appeal, the appeal must be submitted in writing to the three-person appeals panel within 7 calendar days of the issuance of the investigation report. The appeals panel will render a written decision within seven (7) days of its deliberation (or as soon as feasible when extensions are necessary). The written decision on the appeal will be delivered simultaneously to all parties involved.

The decision making process includes:
For a report to proceed to a formal investigation, there must be a reasonable suspicion that the complainant’s allegations, if substantiated, would constitute a violation of the Nondiscrimination or Sexual Misconduct Policy. In the investigation, the investigator’s findings of fact shall be made using the preponderance of the evidence standard (i.e., more likely than not).

Resolution options and how the university decides which process to use:
If a violation of policy is found, the relevant university unit, in consultation with Illinois Human Resources, shall determine and take appropriate corrective and/or disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal if warranted. All corrective action and discipline will be imposed in accordance with applicable University statutes and relevant University rules and regulations.

When required to do so by law or federal guidance, the university will disclose to the complainant any disciplinary sanctions imposed against the respondent(s). Respondent(s) may have an opportunity to challenge or appeal corrective and/or disciplinary actions through the applicable disciplinary policies and procedures and/or grievance process. If no violation of policy is found, the university may still take corrective action if other unit or university rules have been violated and/or when otherwise required based on institutional interests and needs.

Sanctions
The following sanctions are authorized:

Tenured and Tenure-Track Faculty

  • Participation in educational programs about equal opportunity or harassment
  • No contact order
  • Verbal counseling
  • Letter of Expectation
  • Denial of salary increase
  • University of Illinois Statutes, Article IX, Section 6. Severe Sanctions Other Than Dismissal for Cause for Members of the Faculty
  • University of Illinois Statutes, Article X, Section 1, Parts (.c), (d), and (e) (Termination of Tenure)

Specialized Faculty

  • Participation in educational programs about equal opportunity or harassment
  • No contact order
  • Verbal counseling
  • Letter of Expectation
  • Denial of salary increase
  • Non-renewal of appointment
  • Immediate dismissal

Academic Professionals

  • Participation in educational programs about equal opportunity or harassment
  • No contact order
  • Letter of Expectation
  • Denial of salary increase
  • Notice of Non-reappointment
  • Immediate Dismissal

Civil Service

  • Participation in educational programs about equal opportunity or harassment
  • No contact order
  • Work Performance Reminder
  • Written Reminder
  • Decision Making Leave
  • Denial of salary increase (for certain classifications)
  • Discharge

Graduate Employees

  • Participation in educational programs about equal opportunity or harassment
  • No contact order
  • Reassignment
  • Letter of Expectation
  • Termination

Extra Help/Academic Hourly

  • Immediate termination

Disclosure
The university will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by such institution against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as the result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall be treated as the alleged victim for purposes of this paragraph.

Confidentiality
The university will attempt to protect the identity of persons who report having been victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, consistent with its legal obligations to protect the safety of the campus community.

Personal identifiable information about the victim will be treated as confidential and only shared with persons with a specific need to know who are investigating/adjudicating the complaint or delivering resources or support services to the complainant (for example, publicly available record-keeping for purposes of Clery Act reporting and disclosures will be made without inclusion of identifying information about the victim). Further, the institution will maintain as confidential, any accommodations or protective measures provided to the victim to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to provide the accommodations or protective measures.

The university does not publish the name of crime victims nor house identifiable information regarding victims in the University Police Department’s Daily Crime Log or online. Victims have the right to require that directory information about them not be disclosed. To make this request, a student must submit a “Request to Suppress Directory Information” to the Office of the Registrar 217-333-6565. Students who request suppression of directory information usually do so because of serious, even dangerous, circumstances. It is critical that their privacy be protected in every situation. If a student has elected to suppress directory information, the university will respond to inquiries as follows: “There is no information available for any student by that name.”

Interim protective measures and sanctions
The university may implement protective measures following the report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and/or stalking, which may include some or all of the following actions: no contact orders, no trespass orders, changes to class schedules, and changes to room assignments in housing.

Sanctions for student disciplinary violations are noted in the previous section on the student disciplinary process.

For students, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are violations of the Student Code. Employees who violate the sexual misconduct policy will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination of employment. Sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are criminal acts which also may subject the perpetrator to criminal and civil penalties under federal and state law.

The Title IX and Disability Coordinator or his or her designee will determine whether interim interventions and protective measures should be implemented, and, if so, take steps to implement those protective measures as soon as possible.

Examples of interim protective measures include, but are not limited to: a university order of no contact, an order of no trespass, counseling and/or medical services, residence hall relocation, temporary housing, or changes to dining situations, adjustment of course schedules or other academic adjustments, a leave of absence, assistance with transportation situations, or changes to work situations, such as reassignment to a different supervisor or position or adjusting reporting lines. These remedies may be applied to one, both, or multiple parties involved. Violations of university orders of no contact, no trespass and/or protective measures will constitute related violations that may lead to additional disciplinary action. Protective measures imposed may be temporary pending the results of an investigation or may become permanent as determined by the university.

Confidential advising/advocacy for victims
Victims also have the right to have a confidential adviser with them throughout the student disciplinary process. Confidential advisers are available through the Women’s Resources Center and are also available for support and advocacy prior to, and regardless of, initiating a student or employee disciplinary process. Confidential advisers are available to provide campus-specific crisis management and advocacy, share referral services, explore and navigate reporting options, and victim advisement.

Women’s Resources Center
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137

 

Sex offender registration

The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, enacted on October 28, 2000, requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement agency information provided by a State concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a State to provide notice, as required under State law, of each institution of higher education in that State at which the person is employed, carries on a vocation, volunteers services or is a student.

If the offender resides in an unincorporated area, he or she will register with the County Sheriff’s Office. You can link to this information, which appears on the Illinois State Police website, by accessing isp.state.il.us/sor.

 

Clery Act compliance

The U.S. Department of Education created The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting 2016 Edition to present step-by-step procedures, examples, and references for higher education institutions to follow in meeting the campus safety and security requirements of the amended Higher Education Act of 1965. This document can be accessed by visiting www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/handbook.pdf.

Campus Policy

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Clery Act Policy addresses the campus’ obligations pursuant to the “Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act,” 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f) (the “Clery Act”). The policy can be found at cam.illinois.edu/policies/fo-21.

Clery Act Compliance Procedures

You can find the compliance procedures at police.illinois.edu/crime-reporting/clery-compliance/compliance-procedures/.

Clery Act website

Visit the Division of Public Safety’s Clery Act section at police.illinois.edu/cleryact.

Part II: Illini Center separate campus

 

Introduction

Chicago River
View of the Chicago River from the Illini Center in Chicago.

The Illini Center is a facility located at 200 S. Wacker Drive, Chicago, which serves students, alumni, faculty and staff living and working in the Chicago area. Because a small number of graduate students pursuing a degree attend evening and weekend classes at the Illini Center, the facility qualifies as a separate campus under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. The center has no on-campus student housing facilities, so a fire safety report has not been included in this section.

Unless otherwise indicated in this Part, all of the Urbana-Champaign main campus policies, programs, procedures, resources, definitions and contact information set forth in Part I also apply to the Illini Center and for that reason, it is important to read Part I in conjunction with Part II. In addition, Part II only contains information that specifically applies to the Illini Center. That is, unless specific information is included in Part II for the Illini Center, then the information in Part I applies to the Illini Center. Accordingly, the information contained in Part I is integral to the Illini Center and should be consulted in conjunction with this Part.

 

Prompt reporting of a crime or emergency

Community members, students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to accurately and promptly report all crimes and public safety-related incidents to the Chicago Police Department.
Call any of the following authorities, 24 hours a day:

  • Dial 9-1-1: Report emergencies or criminal violations by dialing 9-1-1.
  • Dial 3-1-1: Report non-emergency requests for police services by dialing this number.
  • Call the Chicago Rape Crisis 24-hour hotline, 888-293-2080, to request crisis services.
  • Cook County Crime Stoppers, 800-535-7867: Anonymously report information about a crime.

For general information, contact the Chicago Police Department at 3-1-1 (non-emergencies), dial 9-1-1 (emergencies only). Any suspicious activity should be reported to police.

Crimes should be reported to the Illini Center Director (who is a Campus Security Authority) for the purpose of making timely warning reports to the community using the procedures set forth in the section of Part I titled “Crime notices and emergency notification” and for inclusion in the annual statistical disclosure.

 

Response to a reported crime or emergency

The Illini Center campus does not have its own police force, nor does the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Police Department have a presence on this campus. Building security provides security at the campus. In response to a call of a reported crime, criminal behavior or an emergency, Chicago Police will take the required action, either dispatching an officer or asking the victim to present to the Chicago Police Department to file an incident report. Police reports will be generated for all criminal activity on campus. Follow-up investigations of reported criminal activity are conducted on a case-by-case basis. In cases of reported sexual assault or rape, responding staff, including Chicago Police, will offer the victim a variety of services.

 

Voluntary confidential reporting

Illini Center
Inside the Illini Center.

We encourage anyone who witnessed or has been a victim of a crime to immediately report the incident to the Chicago Police Department by calling 9-1-1, or for a non-emergency, 3-1-1. Police reports in the state of Illinois are public records, and the Chicago Police cannot hold reports of crime in confidence.

In addition to requesting Clery crime data from the Chicago Police Department, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Police collect reports of Clery reportable crimes from Campus Security Authorities. Campus Security Authorities report Clery reportable crimes, if any reports are received, throughout the year to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Police. Each of these reports is reviewed by the University Police to confirm that it meets the requirements under the Clery Act. If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the university or the criminal justice system, you may want to consider consulting a confidential resource. Information disclosed as part of a confidential report will be maintained in a confidential manner to the extent allowable by law and will not be disclosed without your consent to anyone outside the office to which it is reported. Consent may not be required, however, in situations involving suspected child or adult abuse or neglect, court orders or subpoenas, or danger to self or others.

There are no confidential resources located at the Illini Center, however, some university resources located at the Champaign-Urbana campus offer confidentiality, sharing options and advice without having an obligation to report to anyone, unless the complainant wants them to. This privilege is limited to the Counseling Center, McKinley Health Center and the Women’s Resources Center. The latter is the designated counseling space providing confidentiality for survivors of sexual misconduct. Persons making confidential reports to these organizations may authorize the disclosure of certain information about the incident to university authorities for inclusion in the annual crime reporting statistics.

 

Illini Center campus resources

Aside from police, you can seek help or additional information from the following entities.
* Denotes resources specific to the Illini Center. Others serve the Urbana-Champaign campus generally.

Resilience
(formerly Rape Victim Advocates)*

ourresilience.org
180 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago
312-443-9603

Healthcare Alternative Systems*
hascares.org
BASTA Domestic Violence Program
5005 W. Fullerton Ave., Chicago
773-745-7107

Office of the Dean of Students
odos.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-0050

Counseling Center (confidential)
counselingcenter.illinois.edu
206 Turner Student Services Building
610 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-3704

Title IX and Disability Coordinator
wecare.illinois.edu/titleix
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
844-616-7978

McKinley Health Center (confidential)
mckinley.illinois.edu
1109 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana
217-333-2700

LIFE SPAN Legal Services*
life-span.org/legal-services-and-advocacy/
20 E. Jackson Blvd., Suite 500, Chicago
847-824-4454

Women’s Resources Center (confidential)
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Suite 202, Champaign
217-333-3137

Office for Student Conflict Resolution
conflictresolution.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-3680

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
studentaffairs.illinois.edu
121 Swanlund Administration Building
601 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-1300

Office for Access and Equity
oae.illinois.edu
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
217-333-0885

Illinois Human Resources
humanresources.illinois.edu
217 Swanlund Administration Building
601 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-6677

 

 

Security of and access to campus facilities

The Illini Center campus is located at 200 S. Wacker Drive, Chicago. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign leases space on the fourth and 19th floors in this commercial office building, owned by John Hancock Real Estate, in the heart of downtown Chicago. The building is open to the general public, but has monitored access control. John Hancock Real Estate provides 24-hour on-site security. Access into space controlled by the Illini Center is strictly controlled with key card access or visitor log/check-in pass. Building elevators are locked between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. daily. The security staff is not affiliated with the University of Illinois.

Maintenance of campus facilities

The facility and landscaping are maintained in a manner that minimizes hazardous conditions. Illini Center staff regularly surveys space under the university’s control and reports malfunctioning lights and other unsafe physical conditions to the building’s on-site management team for correction. Other members of the university community are helpful when they report equipment problems to the Illini Center staff.

 

Security awareness and crime prevention programs

Given the strong building access controls and 24-hour-per-day security provided by John Hancock Real Estate, safety and security programs at the Illini Center are limited to training students and employees on access procedures. Students may also take advantage of crime prevention and security awareness programs available on the Urbana-Champaign main campus.

 

Emergency notification procedure

UIPD telecommunicator
A telecommunicator may send an Illini-Alert in the event of an emergency.

When a serious incident occurs that causes an immediate threat to the Illini Center, the first responders to the scene are usually members of the Chicago Police Department, Chicago Fire Department, and/or ambulance services and they typically respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the size, scale and seriousness of the incident, other university departments and other local or state or federal agencies could also be involved in responding to the incident. In addition, Office of the Building officials work in cooperation and communicate with Illini Center staff when situations reported to them may warrant an emergency response from the university.

The entire building is equipped with a mass notification system which will sound during an emergency to inform all occupants of the situation and provide instructions regarding how to proceed.

Upon learning from the Office of the Building, the Chicago Police, or other sources of a situation that poses a verified, imminent, or ongoing potential threat to the safety, security, or health of students or employees at the Illini Center, an Emergency Notification will be issued to expedite emergency response and/or evacuation procedures. The goal of an Emergency Notification is to notify as many people as possible, as rapidly as possible, with adequate follow-up information as needed. Follow-up information will be available via use of the Illini-Alert Emergency Notification system (use of text, email, web alert, Twitter and Facebook) on a case-by-case basis. If follow-up information is critical to members of the larger community, it may be disseminated using additional mechanisms at the discretion of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Executive Director of Public Safety or designee. Additional mechanisms may include public media outlets, 217-265-UIPD and/or the telephone alert directory. Emergency Notifications are issued for incidents such as an active threat, major hazardous materials release, major fire, infectious disease outbreak, or a tornado that would directly impact the Illini Center. The process and approvals for issuing an emergency notification for the Illini Center are identical to those of the main campus found in the section of Part I titled “Crime notices and emergency notification.”

 

Emergency response and evacuation procedures

As a part of the comprehensive emergency operation plan for the university, the Illini Center has developed a Building Emergency Action Plan that will be used by Illini Center personnel in the event of an emergency or for emergency training purposes. In the event of an evacuation of the building, occupants will be directed where to go by emergency personnel or Office of the Building officials. Building users should go where directed and wait for an “all clear” message, which will be given by emergency personnel. If an evacuation is ordered, but a direct location is not given by building officials or emergency personnel, occupants should go to the Illini Center designated meeting location. Updates on the building’s status can be obtained by calling the Emergency Voice Mail at 312-656-4110.

Regularly scheduled drills, exercises, and follow-through activities are conducted at the Illini Center annually. All tests are documented with description of the exercise, date, time, and whether announced or unannounced. Appropriate after-action reports are completed. After-action reports detail lessons learned, and follow-up items are identified with responsibilities assigned to appropriate entities. The university’s Basic Emergency Operation Plan, which is compliant with the Illinois Campus Security Enhancement Act, is posted on the Division of Public Safety website to be used in conjunction with Illini Center exercises. The Illini Center conducts an annual test, which may be announced or unannounced, centering on procedures to test the Illini Center’s emergency response and evacuation procedures. A follow-up communication to the Illini Center community will publicize the results of this test.

How you will know to shelter in place

Shelter-in-place procedures, basic shelter-in-place guidance and how to shelter in place are found in the Part I section titled “Shelter-in-place.”

A shelter-in-place notification may come from several sources, including the Office of the Building, University Police (via the Illini-Alert emergency notification system), the Office of Public Affairs, other university employees, or other authorities utilizing the university’s emergency communications tools.

How to shelter in place

If an incident occurs where sheltering-in-place is the best option, follow these steps unless it is not safe to do so or instructed otherwise by emergency personnel:

  1. Once aware of the emergency, seek or remain in a location deemed safe from the affected area.
  2. Once within a safe area, attempt to secure the space in whatever reasonable manner is applicable.
  3. Stay in the area of safety and remain quiet, unless making noise would be beneficial to your safety (i.e. rescue or recovery).
  4. Stay away from objects which may lead to an injury.
  5. Do not leave the area of safety until you are notified that the emergency is no longer a threat to personal safety.

 

Orders of protection

Illini Center
Outside view of the Illini Center.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign complies with Illinois law in recognizing Orders of Protection. Any person who obtains an Order of Protection from Illinois or any other state should provide a copy to the Director of the Illini Center, who will then coordinate with University Police and the Title IX and Disability Coordinator in the Title IX and Disability Office. A meeting will be expeditiously scheduled with the victim to develop a Safety Action Plan, which is a plan for the victim to reduce risk of harm coming to, working or studying in, and going from the Illini Center.

The university cannot apply for a legal order of protection, no contact order or restraining order for a victim from the applicable jurisdiction(s). The victim is required to apply directly for these services. To obtain an Order of Protection, you can: ask your attorney to file in civil court; request an order with your divorce; request an order during a criminal trial for abuse; go to the circuit clerk’s office in the county you reside and get papers to seek an order of protection for yourself, or contact the Healthcare Alternative Systems Inc. – BASTA Domestic Violence Program, or Life Span Legal Services to ask for assistance in completing the forms. University Police will also, as warranted, contact the appropriate Threat Assessment Team and convene its membership as stated in the university’s Campus Violence Prevention Plan in accordance with the Campus Violence Threat Assessment Policy.

The university may issue an institutional no contact order if deemed appropriate or at the request of the complainant or respondent in a Title IX complaint. To the extent of the complainant’s cooperation and consent, university offices will work cooperatively to protect the complainant’s health, physical safety, work and academic status, pending the outcome of a formal university investigation of the complaint. For example, if reasonably available, a complainant may be offered changes to academic or working situations in addition to counseling, health services, visa/immigration assistance and assistance in notifying appropriate local law enforcement.

 

Illini Center sexual misconduct resources

* denotes confidential resource

Chicago area

Resilience
(formerly Rape Victim Advocates)

ourresilience.org
180 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago
312-443-9603

Mujeres Latinas En Accion
mujereslatinasenaccion.org
2424 W. 21st Place, Chicago
773-890-7676

LIFE SPAN Legal Services
life-span.org/legal-services-and-advocacy/
20 E. Jackson Blvd., Suite 500, Chicago
847-824-4454

Apna Ghar
apnaghar.org
4350 N. Broadway Ave., Chicago
Second Floor
800-717-0757

Chicago Police Department
First District-Central
cityofchicago.org/police
1718 S. State St., Chicago
312-745-4290

The Center on Halsted
centeronhalsted.org
3656 N. Halsted Ave., Chicago
773-871-2273

Healthcare Alternative Systems
hascares.org
BASTA Domestic Violence Program
5005 W. Fullerton Ave., Chicago
773-745-7107

 
Urbana-Champaign campus

Counseling Center*
counselingcenter.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 206
217-333-3704

McKinley Health Center*
mckinley.illinois.edu
1109 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana
217-333-2700

Women’s Resources Center*
oiir.illinois.edu/womens-center
616 E. Green St., Champaign
Suite 202
217-333-3137

Office for Access and Equity
oae.illinois.edu
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
217-333-0885

Office of the Dean of Students
Student Assistance Center
odos.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-0050

Office for Student Conflict Resolution
conflictresolution.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 300
217-333-3680

Title IX and Disability Coordinator
wecare.illinois.edu/titleix
616 E. Green St., Suite 214, Champaign
844-616-7978

University Police Department
police.illinois.edu
1110 W. Springfield Ave., Urbana
217-333-1216

Office of Student Financial Aid
osfa.illinois.edu
620 E. John St., Champaign
217-333-0100

Student Legal Services
odos.illinois.edu/sls
1401 W. Green St., Urbana (rm. 324)
217-333-9053

International Student and Scholar Services
isss.illinois.edu
610 E. John St., Champaign
Room 400
217-333-1303

 
State and national

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)
rainn.org
800-656-4673

Love Is Respect
loveisrespect.org
866-331-9474

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
nsvrc.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline
thehotline.org
800-799-7233

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
ncadv.org

National Stalking Resource Center
victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center

 

 

Illini Center crime statistics

These are the crimes that have been reported to University Police by victims who have filed a report, by Campus Security Authorities who have been made aware of a criminal incident or by other law enforcement agencies. This table includes only crimes pertaining to the Illini Center separate campus. This table does not include crimes which occurred at or near the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign main campus. Those numbers are reflected in the table in the Crime Statistics section of Part I.

* The Illini Center has no on-campus residence hall facilities, so that category is not included in this set of statistics.

Criminal offenses reported by hierarchy

Offense On campus Non-campus property Public property
Murder/non-negligent manslaughter 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Manslaughter by negligence 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Rape 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Fondling 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Incest 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Robbery 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Aggravated assault 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Burglary 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Motor vehicle theft 2018 0 0 1
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Arson1 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0


Footnotes
1. Arson is not part of the hierarchy. Arson is always counted regardless of the nature of any other offenses that were committed during the same incident.

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) offenses

Offense On campus Non-campus property Public property
Domestic Violence 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Dating violence 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Stalking 2018 0 0 0
2017 1 0 0
2016 0 0 0

 

 

Arrests and referrals for disciplinary action

Offense On campus Non-campus property Public property
Liquor Law Arrests 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Drug Law Arrests 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Weapons Law Arrests 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Drug Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0
Weapons Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2018 0 0 0
2017 0 0 0
2016 0 0 0

Hate crimes

In 2018, there were 0 hate crimes.
In 2017, there were 0 hate crimes.
In 2016, there were 0 hate crimes.

Unfounded crimes

In 2018, there were 0 unfounded crimes.
In 2017, there were 0 unfounded crimes.
In 2016, there were 0 unfounded crimes.

 

Part III: Annual Fire Safety Report

Introduction

Urbana Fire Department truck
Urbana Fire Department truck.

University Housing and Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), have developed an annual fire safety report. This document summarizes the reporting components required by the HEOA.

This section applies to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign main campus only because the Illini Center campus does not have on-campus housing.

Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety and University Housing are committed to providing students with fire safety training and a safe community for living and learning.

 

Fire Reporting

If there is an active fire on campus, dial 9-1-1.

If a member of the campus community finds evidence of a fire that has been extinguished and the person is not sure whether the police department or fire department has already responded, the community member should immediately notify the Division of Public Safety at 217-333-1216.

To report evidence of a fire in University Housing, contact the following person/persons:

Director, Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety: 217-244-7215, and then the applicable person below:

  • Resident Director of each undergraduate hall (see Housing info): 217-333-0770
  • Complex Director for the graduate residence halls and apartments: 217-333-5656
  • To report evidence of a fire at the Chez Veterans Center contact: Director/LSO, Chez Veterans Center, 217-300-5368

Fire incidents reported to any of these individuals which are found to have been actual fires will be included in the annual fire statistics.

Fire log

A log of all campus fires is maintained by Campus Code Compliance and Fire Safety. The log may be viewed at Facilities and Services, Code Compliance and Fire Safety, Physical Plant Services Building, 1501 S. Oak St., Champaign, during the hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 217-244-7215 for more information.

 

Fire prevention policies and procedures

University Housing has developed policies and procedures for a safe community. These procedures are communicated to the residence halls students through the publication, Housing Hallmarks.

Students are also responsible for the policies of the student code, which are the rules and regulations of all students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The applicable fire prevention policies are as follows:

A. Student code policies

§ 1-310 Unauthorized Use, Abuse, or Interference with Fire Protection Equipment, Firefighting Personnel, or Warning Devices.

  1. The unauthorized use, abuse, or interference with fire protection equipment, firefighting personnel, or warning devices may result in death, injury, or substantial property damage. It is critically important that all fire protection equipment be in its place and in proper working condition if the safety and welfare of the members of the university community are to be assured.
  2. It is a violation of Illinois criminal law to willfully or maliciously cut, injure, damage, tamper with or destroy any fire hydrant, fire hose, fire engine, or other public or private firefighting equipment or any apparatus pertaining to such equipment or firefighting personnel, or to intentionally open any fire hydrant without proper authorization. It is also a violation of Illinois criminal law to knowingly, without authorization, damage any property supported in whole or in part with state funds or federal funds administered or granted through a state agency. Other Illinois laws may also relate to the unauthorized use, abuse, or interference with fire protection equipment or warning devices.
  3. A violation of any federal, state, or local law concerning fire protection equipment or firefighting personnel may result in suspension or dismissal from the university.
  4. Tampering with locks, other door hardware, cameras or other equipment used to provide security on campus (including the unauthorized propping of doors) may result in suspension or dismissal from the University.
  5. Enabling unauthorized access to campus facilities by providing keys or access cards or by other means may result in suspension or dismissal from the University.

B. University Housing Hallmarks policies and procedures (residence halls)

Smoking

As of January 1, 2014, smoking is prohibited on all campus property at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, both indoors and outdoors, in university-owned vehicles and in privately-owned vehicles parked on campus property.

Candles

Due to fire hazards associated with an open flame, open flames are prohibited. Candles may not be kept or burned in individual residence hall rooms.

Fireworks

Fireworks or pyrotechnic explosive devices are not permitted by state statutes and are prohibited in the residence halls.

Flammables

Any substance that potentially could cause fire, damage, or explosion is not permitted inside the residence halls. This provision includes kerosene heaters and fuel, fuel containers for motorcycles or motor vehicles, as well as candles, open flames, fragrance pots, blow torches, bottled propane, and similar burning devices.

Decorations

The Fire Department must inspect any major decorative construction (e.g., platforms, haunted houses, and obstacle courses) for fire safety before it is used. Students should follow these expectations for fire-safe decorations:

  • Use fire-resistant materials in student rooms and at social events.
  • Do not overload electrical outlets or extension cords.
  • Don’t run electrical cords under carpet, through doorways or windows, or behind pillows.
  • Provide adequate safety lighting at all social events.
  • Do not obstruct access to exits and fire extinguishers.
  • Natural, live trees are not permitted.
  • Decorations may not be hung from ceilings.
Appliances

Residents may use a reasonable number of UL-approved electronic devices in their room so long as they do not present a fire hazard or consume an excess of power. Devices with an exposed heating element are considered a fire hazard. The following appliances are permitted in the residence halls:

  • Alarm clock
  • Blender
  • Computer
  • Curling iron, electric razor, and hairdryer
  • Desk/study lamp
  • Electric blanket
  • Electric coffee maker/tea maker
  • Fan
  • Microwave up to 800 watts (one per room)
  • Popcorn popper
  • Refrigerator (no more than one per room – 4.4 cubic feet)
  • Video game consoles (PlayStation, Xbox, Wii, etc.)
  • Stereo
  • TV, Blu-Ray or DVD player
Cooking

Cooking meals is only permitted in designated hall kitchenettes. Hall kitchenettes are not intended for regular meal preparation because they cannot accommodate the number of residents in each hall.

Use of microwave ovens, popcorn poppers, or other approved electrical appliances is permitted in resident rooms for preparation of snacks. One micro-fridge unit is provided in all Sherman Hall and Daniels Hall rooms. Residents may not prepare meals in their room, as it is a violation of state health codes. Residents may be charged up to $50 per occurrence or lose their Housing contract. Toasters, toaster-ovens, and grills are not permitted in resident rooms at any time.

Extension cords and power strips

Extension cords are to be used with small electrical appliances only, such as an alarm clock, lamp, or popcorn popper, and should be sized for the electrical load being served. Only one appliance should be plugged in at a time. However, power strips with surge suppressants are strongly encouraged for all electrical needs, especially large appliances such as refrigerators, computers, and stereos. Power strips should include a self-contained fuse, which reduces the risk of a tripped circuit breaker on the floor.

Construction

Construction such as panels, dividers, lofts, shelves, and bunks is not permitted. Residents may not place boards or weights on radiator covers or wall-mounted bookshelves, and may not place beds on top of other furniture. Hot tubs are not permitted.

Halogen lamp

Due to the high risk of fire, halogen lamps are not permitted in the residence halls.

Incense

The residence halls are smoke-free environments; therefore, incense is not permitted in the halls.

Motorcycles/scooters

Motorcycles, scooters, mopeds, and all such motorized vehicles must be registered with the university, parked only in designated motorcycle lots, and operated in accordance with rules of the road for automobiles. They may not be driven on bike paths or sidewalks, and they may not be brought inside any residence hall. Fuel or fuel containers (even if empty) may not be brought inside any room or building; doing so is prohibited by state statutes.

Room Inspections

During announced periods and during vacations, staff members may inspect rooms to assess possible fire and life-safety hazards. Damages in resident’s room will also be noted during these inspections. Staff does not open drawers or search through personal belongings. They will report apparent violations of regulations or statutes to the appropriate office. Residents are billed for damages, missing furniture, or irregularities encountered in the room.

Life-safety room inspections are conducted early in the fall semester and again as needed by the resident advisor or Housing Facilities staff. Staff will assess the hazards or life-safety concerns associated with the following items:

  • Extension cords: damaged, overloaded, routed under carpet, not UL-approved, etc.
  • Overloaded electrical outlets: UL approved power strips with circuit breakers should be used.
  • Refrigerators: less than 4.4 cubic feet, restricted to one per room
  • Hazardous cooking and household appliances: microwaves are the only cooking appliances permitted; halogen lamps and space heaters are not permitted.
  • Flammable liquids: storage of kerosene, fuel, or fuel containers are not permitted.
  • Self-closing door hinges: may not be removed from student rooms and hallway doors.
  • Excessive combustible materials: excess trash/recyclables; ceilings, smoke detectors, walls or windows covered with drapes/posters; excessive holiday light strings; etc.
  • Lofts: not permitted
  • Furnishings contacting room heaters
  • Smoke detector functioning and not tampered with: covered, disconnected, or removed
  • Cigarettes, candles, incense: use is not permitted in the residence halls.

Plans for future improvements in fire safety

Campus fire safety officials review fire safety policies and equipment on an ongoing basis. While there are no specific plans for future improvements, fire safety officials will continue to maintain, continually assess and upgrade fire safety apparatus as needed.

Fire Safety Equipment

Fire equipment saves lives. Tampering with smoke detectors, intentionally causing false fire alarms, hanging items from sprinkler heads, propping fire and smoke doors open, discharging a fire extinguisher, or tampering with other safety equipment could result in personal tragedy and, additionally, criminal charges, fines, university disciplinary action, and/or termination of a resident’s Housing contract.

Sprinklers

Do not hang anything on or from sprinkler heads: this can cause unnecessary water discharge and you could be held liable for damage to university and private property.

Fire Extinguishers

Fire extinguishers will be charged, available, and operable at all times. Tampering with fire extinguishers is a serious offense and could lead to your dismissal from the university.

Smoke Detectors

Smoke detectors save lives! Students must submit a Request for Services to the area/hall office to report a damaged or faulty smoke detector. Only residence hall staff may disconnect smoke detectors; the building maintenance inspector will replace damaged or faulty detectors. Any resident who disconnects, covers, or otherwise tampers with a smoke detector will be assessed a $250 fine and referred to the university discipline system. There is a $120 minimum charge for tampering with a smoke detector in a central area. Also, state law provides that tampering with, removing, or destroying a smoke detector is a Class A misdemeanor. This equipment is in place for resident’s safety and for that of neighboring rooms. Residents who tamper with fire equipment will be referred for disciplinary action and/or residence hall contract termination.

Self-Closing Hinges

All residents’ room, floor, and outside security doors are fitted with self-closing hinges. These mechanisms help prevent the rapid spread of fire by ensuring doors are properly closed. Residents may not remove these hinges from doors.

Fire Alarms and Fire Drills

For resident safety in residence halls, a fire drill will be conducted early in each semester. Therefore there are at least two fire drills each calendar year.

Inspection, testing and maintenance of fire protection systems and equipment

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Housing Facilities Department administers this element of the campus fire safety program with support from Facilities and Services, Residential Life, Dining, and fire protection contractors. All fire protection systems and equipment in the residence halls is tested, inspected, and maintained using guidance from applicable National Fire Protection Association standards.

 

Procedures for evacuation from student housing in case of fire (students and employees)

Whenever the fire alarm sounds everyone must evacuate the building.

When a fire alarm sounds, residents should follow the instructions outlining their evacuation route which are posted on the back of their room door. Fire drills, false alarms, and genuine fire alarms are indistinguishable.

Smoke is the major cause of death from fires within residence halls. For this reason, residents should be certain to close their room door and windows when evacuating in order to retard the spread of smoke. Hallway and stairwell fire doors should be closed at all times.

Even in a building designed to be resistant to fire, a small wastebasket fire can quickly fill an area with smoke and deadly gases. Obstructing a doorway, exit, stairwell, or room door is a serious safety hazard.

Residents and staff cannot re-enter the building until the Residential Life/Housing staff, Fire Department, or University Police give an “all clear” signal.
Residents and staff who fail to evacuate a building during a fire alarm or who do not follow the directives of fire, police, or staff will be referred to the appropriate university discipline system for action.

Emergency evacuation procedures

If a fire occurs in a residence hall, the fire alarm response directly reports to Department of Public Safety dispatch who summons first responders like the fire department. Because the fire alarm system is an addressable system, the responding engine company will be given information in route that identifies the specific location in the building that was activated. This feature saves critical time for the responders as they search for fire conditions when they arrive.

Fire alarm systems notify building occupants of a potential fire, thus initiating a building evacuation sequence. As conveyed during fire drills, building occupants are directed to the nearest building exit upon activation of the fire alarm system. Use of the elevators is strictly prohibited and is controlled by the fire department upon arrival to the fire call to assist in firefighting and rescue efforts. Building occupants cannot re-enter the building until the Residential Life/Housing staff, Fire Department, or University Police indicate that it is safe to do so. After every fire alarm activation or reported fire condition, the resident director on duty is responsible for submitting a fire alarm report to the Office of Residential Life. It is policy to maintain an active list of those occupants who may be permanently or temporarily disabled and unable to evacuate if the elevators are not operational. This list is coordinated by the Housing Information Office (assignment office) and kept on file in the residential area and at the fire department. The fire department has access to this list when responding to fire alarm activation so they can better prepare and strategize the potential rescue of physically disabled occupants.

Emergency evacuation procedures for residents are posted on the back of each room door.

Family and graduate housing residents

In case of fire, immediately activate the building’s fire alarm system. Evacuate the building unless otherwise notified, and call 9-1-1.

If you discover a fire:

  1. Manually activate the building’s fire alarm system.
  2. Immediately evacuate the building, closing doors and windows behind you.
  3. Do not use the elevators.
  4. Locate those persons with special needs and provide assistance if possible. Otherwise, provide their location to emergency responders.
  5. Report to your building’s designated gathering point.
  6. Call 9-1-1.

Once the fire alarm is activated:

  1. Walk quickly to the nearest exit. Do not use the elevators.
  2. If you are able, help those who need special assistance.
  3. Notify fire personnel if you believe someone may still be in the building.
  4. Gather away from the building and emergency responders at a designated location.
  5. Do not re-enter the building until the fire department has cleared the scene.

If caught in smoke:

  1. Do not breathe the smoke.
  2. Drop to your knees and crawl to the closest safe exit.
  3. Breathe through your nose, and use a shirt or towel to breathe through, if possible.

If trapped in a building:

  1. Close all doors and windows.
  2. Wet and place cloth material around and under the door to prevent smoke from entering.
  3. Attempt to signal people outside of the building. Call for help using a telephone or cell phone.

Fire Extinguishers
Each apartment has a fire extinguisher that is inspected prior to a new resident’s arrival and is checked by Housing Facilities Maintenance each year. It is important for you to read the instructions and know how to remove the fire extinguisher from the wall and operate it safely. Check the gauge monthly to make sure the needle is in the green area.

Using a Fire Extinguisher:

  1. Report the fire first (call 9-1-1 from any campus phone, or call 9-1-1 from a cell phone or off campus).
  2. Use a fire extinguisher only if you have been trained to do so. Improper use can increase the hazard.
Chez Veterans Center

Fire
The residential program component of the Chez Veterans Center utilizes a “Defend in Place” strategy in responding to a triggered fire alarm. This is the strategy recommended by the National Fire Protection Association to protect the residents of facilities such as the Center for whom it is impractical to promptly evacuate in an emergency. The Center’s Administrative staff and those serving in an Emergency Responder positions are trained to assess the situation and to protect residents who are unable to evacuate until fire department personnel arrive. If a fire is detected, the Fire Departments of Urbana and Champaign will dispatch all firefighters to assist the students with disabilities in evacuation of the building when deemed necessary. Due to facility staff changes the fire drills for 2018 were not conducted. They are scheduled for 2019 fall semester.

  • First floor public areas: Everyone in any of the first floor public areas should exit the building as quickly as possible. Residents should gather across the street, to the south of the Center, in the vacant grass lot next to the Dance Studio. The address is 907 1/2 W. Nevada Street, Urbana.
  • First floor and second floor residents: The elevator is not to be used in event of a fire. Staff and residents with disabilities who are on the second or third floor when the fire alarm is activated should gather at the “Area of Rescue Assistance” located at the elevator lobby, if it is safe to do so. Members of the Emergency Responder staff will assist students with disabilities to safely muster at that location. Emergency Responder staff, if safe to do so, will inspect each office and common areas to ensure that individuals with disabilities have been safely moved to the designated Area of Rescue Assistance. If staff or students cannot safely exit an office due to fire, they should shut the room doors to prevent any fire or smoke that might spread. It is essential that students not interfere with staff members who are attempting to complete their assigned emergency response tasks.
  • Third floor residents: The elevator is not to be used in the event of a fire. Residents with disabilities, who are in their chairs, should close their room doors and turn on the lights to their rooms. Emergency Responder No. 1 will remove the student from the room that triggered the alarm, and the student in the adjoining room from the area. Residents must not interfere with staff members who are attempting to complete their assigned emergency response tasks.
  • Staff: The Life Safety Officer is the director; Responder No. 1 is the business/administrative associate. All other personal assistant staff are to meet at the Area of Rescue Assistance on the first floor and receive direction from the Life Safety Officer. All emergency responder staff will follow their assigned duties.

Floor diagrams are to be in place on the inner door of each resident’s room and inspected at least once per semester.

All residents who can exit the building shall gather across the street at the vacant grass lot next to the Dance Studio. The address is 907 1/2 W. Nevada St., Urbana.

Tornado
In the event of a tornado watch, the Center Administrative staff on duty will be responsible for monitoring WDWS-AM 1400 or WDWS-FM 97.5 or the NOAA weather radio.

Take Cover Plan for the center’s third floor residential services: In the event of a “Take Cover” signal the administrative staff is to be notified. Students and staff can also listen for the three-minute blast from the Emergency Management Agency’s warning siren and begin moving toward the basement level storm refuge area.

The Life Safety Officer with the assistance of the Emergency Responder No. 1, and Emergency Responder No. 2 are responsible for closing room doors, windows, patio doors and drapes, checking to see how many students are in bed and not able to readily relocate to the storm refuge area on the basement level of the building, and assuring that all other students are proceeding to the designated safety area.

All students are to move to the basement level storm refuge area. The elevator may be used to get to the basement level. Once there, students are to take locations in the storm refuge area. They are to remain in the storm refuge area of the basement level until the “all clear” is given by the Life Safety Officer.

Students who are in bed are given the choice to get up or to be covered with blankets to protect them from any debris.

Residents who fail to follow the directives of police, fire or Center Emergency Response Team during an emergency will be referred for disciplinary procedures.

Medical emergencies
In the event of a medical emergency students are to contact 9-1-1 and arrange for immediate medical assistance. McKinley Health Center serves as a support for university students. McKinley Health Center provides 24-hour nurse coverage, available by calling Dial-a-Nurse at 217-333-2700.

Information regarding the programs and services of McKinley Health Services can be obtained online at mckinley.illinois.edu.

All residents of the Center are responsible for all health care and medical costs in emergency and non-emergency situations.

Medical transportation: In the event of a life-threatening emergency, residents should call 9-1-1 and arrange transportation through the use of an ambulance. When contacting 9-1-1, the nature of the illness should be conveyed so that the ambulance is staffed with Emergency Medical Technicians who are aware of the resident’s medical needs.

At those times when the illness or injury does not appear to be a life-threatening emergency, Center residents may contact the Disability Resources and Educational Services (DRES) transportation office and arrange for a bus to carry them to McKinley Health Center (MHC) and/or the local hospital facilities. This service is only available during regularly scheduled hours. These hours are noted in the DRES services handbook. At all other times, residents are required to make transportation arrangements either through 9-1-1 or through private arrangements, i.e. family, friend, taxi, etc. Note: Center employees, including resident advisers, personal assistants, etc., are not licensed to transport residents.

 

Fire safety education training initiatives

Champaign Fire Department
Champaign Fire Department prior to a football game.

In 2018, the following fire safety training events were conducted:

  • Fire safety training was provided for residence hall professional and paraprofessional staff in August 2018.
  • Fire hazard inspections were conducted in residence hall rooms.
  • Fire drills were conducted each semester in all undergraduate halls and a third fire drill was conducted at graduate halls in June.
  • Fire safety training for Orchard Downs staff was provided at the Orchard Downs Community Center, along with a “touch a truck” safety program for children living in the complex.
  • Fire safety training materials were distributed by the Urbana Fire Department to families on move-in day at their assigned Urbana residence hall.
  • The New Student Safety Fair held in August 2018 included fire safety training and interactive demonstrations.
  • Yearlong marketing plans have been developed to educate residents through the use of posters, bulletin boards and video messages on topics of fire safety.

 

Fire protective features in residence halls

The university houses students in 15 undergraduate residence complexes with 1 to 4 halls in each complex and 2 graduate residence halls. In addition, the university manages 3 multi-family apartment complexes for married students and students with families and also the Chez Veterans Center. This section provides a description of the fire protection features provided in each Housing facility.

Undergraduate

  1. Ikenberry South – Scott Hall (202 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign)
  2. Ikenberry South – Snyder Hall (206 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign)
  3. Ikenberry South – Taft-Van Doren Residence Halls (1213-1215 S. Fourth St., Champaign)
  4. Ikenberry South – Bousfield Hall (1214 S. First St., Champaign)
  5. Ikenberry North – Weston Hall (204 E. Peabody Dr., Champaign)
  6. Ikenberry North – Hopkins Hall (103 E. Gregory Dr., Champaign)
  7. Ikenberry North – Wassaja Hall (1202 S. First St., Champaign)
  8. Ikenberry North – Nugent Hall (207 E. Gregory Dr., Champaign)
  9. Ikenberry North – Clark-Barton-Lundgren Halls (1201-1205 S. Fourth St., Champaign)
  10. Illinois Street Residence Hall (Townsend and Wardall) (918-1012 W. Illinois St., Urbana)
  11. Busey and Evans Residence Halls (1111-1115 W. Nevada St., Urbana)
  12. Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall (1005 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana)
  13. Allen Residence Hall (1005 W. Gregory Dr., Urbana)
  14. Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Hall (Babcock, Blaisdell, Carr, Saunders) (901-1002 College Ct., Urbana)
  15. Florida Avenue Residence Hall (Trelease & Ogelsby) (901 and 1005 College Ct., Urbana)

Graduate

  1. Sherman Hall (909 S. Fifth St., Champaign)
  2. Daniels Hall (1010 W. Green St., Urbana)
  3. Family Housing (1107 W. Green St., Urbana)
  4. Goodwin & Green Apartments (300 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana)
  5. Orchard Downs Apartments (1841 Orchard Place, Urbana)
  6. Ashton Woods Apartments (2215-2319 S. First St., Urbana)
  7. Also: Chez Veterans Center (908 W. Nevada St., Urbana)

Ikenberry South Residence Halls

Ikenberry South consists of four halls, each monitored by a supervised fire alarm system. Scott Hall, Taft and Van Doren Halls are also protected by automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler systems that are integrated with the fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised by Public Safety Dispatch. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell of each building. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system. Fire suppression systems were installed in Snyder Hall in 2012.

Bousfield Hall was placed into service in August of 2013. It has a supervised fire alarm and sprinkler system as well as wet standpipes in each stairwell.

Ikenberry North Residence Halls

Ikenberry North includes five halls, each monitored by a supervised fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety Dispatch. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell of building. Clark Hall and Nugent Hall are protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the fire alarm system. Multipurpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically propped open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system. Clark Hall is equipped with a fire pump. Clark Hall is the location of the Housing administrative offices. Clark is separated from Barton and Lundgren Halls by fire rated construction. Sprinkler systems are in place throughout Weston, Barton, Lundgren, and Hopkins Halls.

Wassaja Hall opened in fall 2016. It has all of the fire protection and life safety features of the other four Ikenberry North residence halls including, a supervised fire alarm system integrated with a wet-pipe fire sprinkler system with standpipes as well as multipurpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers.

Illinois Street Residence Hall

Illinois Street Residence Hall is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard chemical suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell of each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system. Illinois Street Residence Hall is equipped with a fire pump.

Busey and Evans Halls

Busey and Evans Residence Hall are protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard wet chemical suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell in each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system.

Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall

Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard wet chemicals suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Dry standpipes are located in each of the stairwells. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system. Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall and Allen Hall have a shared single fire alarm main panel.

Allen Hall

Allen Residence Hall is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard wet chemicals suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each of the stairwells. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system. Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall and Allen Hall have a shared single fire alarm main panel.

Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Hall

Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Hall, which includes Babcock, Blaisdell, Carr and Saunders, is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe and dry pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard wet chemicals suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Dry standpipes are located in each stairwell in each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system.

Florida Avenue Residence Hall

Florida Avenue Residence Hall, which consists of Oglesby and Trelease, is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Cooking operations under the kitchen hoods are protected by special hazard wet chemicals suppression systems, which are also integrated with the building fire alarm system. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Dry standpipes are located in each stairwell in each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held-open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system that has prerecorded voice messaging capability but is not used at this time for evacuation purposes. This system as currently set up, may be used as a voice notification system only. Florida Avenue Residence Hall is equipped with a fire pump.

Sherman Hall

Sherman Hall is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each of the corridors of each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held- open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system that has prerecorded voice messaging for evacuation purposes. Sherman Hall is equipped with a fire pump.

Daniels Hall

Daniels Hall is protected by an automatic, supervised wet pipe sprinkler system that is integrated with the building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell of each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators, magnetically held- open fire-rated door assemblies, and air handling units are also integrated with the fire alarm system that has prerecorded voice messaging capability but is not used at this time for evacuation purposes. This system as currently set up may be used as a voice notification system only. Daniels Hall is equipped with a fire pump.

Goodwin-Green apartments

A sprinkler system is in place throughout Goodwin-Green Family Apartments complex, and it is integrated with the automatic building fire alarm system. The fire alarm system is continuously monitored and supervised at Public Safety dispatch. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are installed on each floor as well as throughout the common areas, basement storage areas and mechanical spaces in the complex. Wet standpipes are located in each stairwell of each building. Other features include an emergency generator to power emergency lights and exit signs to illuminate the means of egress. Elevators are also integrated with the fire alarm system.

Orchard Downs apartments

Orchard Downs consists of 70 apartment buildings (1 story – 3 stories), 2 standalone laundries, and a one-story community center. Each apartment is equipped with a smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are located in the kitchen of each apartment as well as in the Laundries and Community Center. Other features include battery-backup emergency lights and exit signs in the Community Center to illuminate the means of egress. Orchard South apartments had fire alarm systems added to two-thirds of the apartment buildings from 2017 to 2018. The last phase of fire alarm installation for this complex will be completed in 2019. These fire alarm systems are continuously monitored by the Division of Public Safety.

Ashton Woods apartments

Ashton Woods consists of 13 apartment buildings with 12 apartments and a laundry area in each building. Each apartment is equipped with a smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector. Smoke detectors are located in hallways and bedrooms and are hard wired together. Multi-purpose ABC dry chemical fire extinguishers are located in the kitchen of each apartment, as well as in the laundry area. The fire alarm systems are continuously monitored by the Division of Public Safety.

Chez Veterans Center

The Chez Veterans Center is a facility that was constructed from 2014 – 2015 and opened in August of 2015. The facility is a three-story building with 12 residential units located on the third floor. The facility is protected throughout by an automatic fire suppression system and an addressable automatic voice fire alarm system. The building is also equipped with an emergency generator that provides emergency lighting and elevator operation in the event of a power outage. There are also dry chemical fire extinguishers placed throughout the facility. The exits and areas of rescue assistance are marked with internally-illuminated signs and the areas of rescue assistance and the building elevators have emergency phones located within them.

 

Fire safety statistics

The fire statistics for the 2016, 2017 and 2018 calendar years are provided in the sections that follow. The category and cause of the fire follow the classifications used by the Department of Education. The estimated dollar values of damages for the events in each facility or complex area are also included utilizing the ranges required by the reporting criteria of the Department of Education.

Note: Fires which occurred in dining facilities which are part of the residence hall complexes are entered in the Department of Education website as occurring in one of the residence halls that are physically attached to the dining facility. The specific fire events of this type that are covered by this report are as follows:

  • The 2016 fire incident summary includes one fire which occurred at the Florida Avenue Residence Halls dining facility, and this fire was assigned in the chart to Trelease Hall. Trelease Hall is attached to the Florida Avenue Residence Halls dining facility. The fire was related to burned cooking materials.
  • The 2016 fire incident summary includes 13 total cooking fires and two fires that were classified as intentional.
  • The 2017 fire incident summary includes one fire which occurred at the Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls dining facility, and this fire was assigned in the chart to Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall. Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall is attached to the Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall dining facility. The fire was related to burned cooking materials.
  • The 2017 fire incident summary includes 4 total cooking fires and one fire that was classified as intentional which resulted from burned paper. Additionally, one electrical fire occurred at the Ashton Woods apartment complex. The summary also includes a fire that is suspected to be the result of improperly discarded smoking materials, but a cause was never officially determined.
  • The 2018 fire incident summary includes one fire which occurred at the Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls dining facility named Fields of Green, and this fire was assigned in the chart to Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls. The Fields of Green specialty restaurant is attached to Lincoln Avenue Residence Halls. The fire was related to burned cooking materials.
  • The 2018 fire incident summary includes three unintentional cooking fires, three fires that were classified as intentional fires where paper and materials on room doors were found to have been burnt. There were also two fires in 2018 that were related to improper disposal of incense and smoking materials as well as two others that were from electrical appliances failures (a washing machine and a computer).

Fires in the following tables fall into one of three categories: (A) undetermined; (B) unintentional; or (C) intentional.

2018 fire incidents in University Housing

Residence Hall Number of Actual Fires Category* Causes Injuries Fatalities Value of Property Damages
Ashton Woods 2 B Cooking 0 0 $0- $99
B Cooking 0 0 $0- $99
Goodwin-Green
Orchard Downs
Daniels Hall
Sherman Hall
Bousfield Hall
Hopkins Hall 1 C Arson (burnt paper) 0 0 $0-$99
Nugent Hall
Wassaja Hall
Lundgren Hall
Barton Hall
Taft Hall
Van Doren Hall
Lincoln Ave Res Hall 1 B Cooking (Fields of Green) 0 0 $100 -$999
Allen Hall 2 C Arson (burnt paper) 0 0 $0 – $99
B Incense in trash 0 0 $100-$999
Scott Hall
Snyder Hall 1 B Washing machine 0 0 $100-$999
Weston Hall
Busey Hall
Evans Hall
Townsend Hall 1 B Smoking 0 0 $100-$999
Wardall Hall
Oglesby Hall 2 B Computer 0 0 $1,000-$9,999
C Arson (burnt doors) 0 0 $100-$999
Trelease Hall
Babcock Hall
Blaisdell Hall
Carr Hall
Saunders Hall
TOTAL FIRES 10

2017 fire incidents in University Housing

Residence Hall Number of Actual Fires Category* Causes Injuries Fatalities Value of Property Damages
Ashton Woods 1 B electrical 0 0 $100-$999
Goodwin-Green
Orchard Downs 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Daniels Hall
Sherman Hall
Bousfield Hall 1 C burnt paper 0 0 $0-$99
Hopkins Hall 1 A smoking (suspected) 0 0 $0-$99
Nugent Hall
Wassaja Hall
Lundgren Hall
Barton Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Taft Hall
Van Doren Hall
Lincoln Ave Res Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Allen Hall
Scott Hall
Snyder Hall
Weston Hall
Busey Hall
Evans Hall
Townsend Hall
Wardall Hall
Oglesby Hall
Trelease Hall
Babcock Hall
Blaisdell Hall
Carr Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $100-$999
Saunders Hall
TOTAL FIRES 7

2016 fire incidents in University Housing

Residence Hall Number of Actual Fires Category* Causes Injuries Fatalities Value of Property Damages
Ashton Woods
Goodwin-Green 1 B cooking 0 0 $1,000-$9,999
Orchard Downs
Daniels Hall 2 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Sherman Hall
Bousfield Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Hopkins Hall
Nugent Hall 2 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
C burnt plastic 0 0 $0-$99
Wassaja Hall
Lundgren Hall
Barton Hall
Taft Hall
Van Doren Hall
Lincoln Ave Res Hall
Allen Hall 2 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Scott Hall 1 C burnt recycling 0 0 $1,000-$9,999
Snyder Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Weston Hall
Busey Hall
Evans Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Townsend Hall
Wardall Hall 2 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Oglesby Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Trelease Hall 1 B cooking 0 0 $0-$99
Babcock Hall
Blaisdell Hall
Carr Hall
Saunders Hall
TOTAL FIRES 15

Fire drills

Residence Hall Fire Drills
2016 2017 2018
Ashton Woods1 0 0 0
Goodwin-Green1 0 0 0
Orchard Downs1 0 0 0
Daniels Hall 3 3 3
Sherman Hall 2 2 2
Bousfield Hall 2 2 2
Hopkins Hall 2 2 2
Lundgren Hall 2 2 2
Barton Hall 2 2 2
Taft Hall 2 2 2
Van Doren Hall 2 2 2
Lincoln Ave Res 2 2 2
Allen Hall 2 2 2
Scott Hall 2 2 2
Snyder Hall 2 2 2
Weston Hall 2 2 2
Busey Hall 2 2 2
Evans Hall 2 2 2
Townsend Hall 2 2 2
Wardall Hall 2 2 2
Oglesby Hall 2 2 2
Trelease Hall 2 2 2
Babcock Hall 2 2 2
Blaisdell Hall 2 2 2
Carr Hall 2 2 2
Saunders Hall 2 2 2
Wassaja Hall 2 2 2
Nugent 2 2 2
Chez Veterans Center 0 1 02


Footnotes
1. Fire drills are not conducted at apartment buildings.
2. No fire drills were conducted at the Chez Veterans Center in 2018 due to a staffing change.

 

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